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I'm writing an OS X application for my personal use where I want to get and subsequently search all files of type plist. I am struggling with the first task. Could you point me in the right direction or provide an online tutorial. Thanks.

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I would like to clarify. I don't want a global search, but rather for a given directory. – John Lane May 4 '12 at 15:06
up vote 0 down vote accepted
NSString *searchDirectory = ...;
NSArray *files = [[NSFileManager defaultManager] contentsOfDirectoryAtPath: searchDirectory 
                                                                     error: NULL];
[files enumerateObjectsUsingBlock: ^(NSString *fileName, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
    if ([[fileName pathExtension] isEqualToString: @"plist"]) {
        NSString *filePath = [searchDirectory stringByAppendingPathComponent: fileName];
        // Do something with the plist file
    }
}];
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1  
Don't check the path extension, check the UTI. -[NSWorkspace typeOfFile:error:] followed by -type:conformsToType: with "com.apple.property-list" as the type. – Ken Thomases May 5 '12 at 18:32

Try with something like this:

NSError *error = nil;
NSString *folder = <# your folder #>;
NSArray *contents = [[NSFileManager defaultManager] contentsOfDirectoryAtPath:folder error:&error];
if (error) {
    <# deal with error #>
} else {
    NSString *path;
    for (NSString *entry in contents) {
        if ([entry hasSuffix:@"plist"]) {
            path = [folder stringByAppendingPathComponent:entry];
            <# do something with file at path #>
        }
    }
}

Also, check related methods in Discovering Directory Contents section in NSFileManager class reference.

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It's still better to check the file extension explicitly because hasSuffix: will return true for a file named "someplist". – Costique May 4 '12 at 15:33
    
Which is awesome if it happens to be a plist file. – djromero May 4 '12 at 15:36

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