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I've got a @ViewScoped bean that calls a @Stateless bean which does a simple query to return some values from my DB.

This should be enough to make the query everytime I load the page, and this should lead me to have always updated data on each page load.

But this won't work, and I don't know how to solve it!

My query returns the old value, even after changing it with MySql Workbench. (Doing the query on Workbench returns correct data!)

Here's the code :

DispensaListBean.java

package ManagedBeans;

import ejb.DispensaManager;
import ejb.DispensaManagerLocal;
import entity.Dispensa;
import java.util.List;
import javax.ejb.EJB;
import javax.faces.bean.ManagedBean;
import javax.faces.bean.ViewScoped;

/**
 *
 * @author stefano
 */
@ManagedBean
@ViewScoped
public class DispensaListBean {
    @EJB
    private DispensaManagerLocal dispensaManager;


    /**
     * Creates a new instance of DIspensaListBean
     */
    public DispensaListBean() {
    }

    public List<Dispensa> getTopDispense(){
        List<Dispensa> l = dispensaManager.findByVoto(DispensaManager.DESC);
        for(Dispensa d : l){
            System.out.println(d.getTitolo() + " | " + d.getVoto()); //This code prints ALWAY the old getVoto() value, it takes the new one just after restarting the server
        }
        return l;
    }

    public List<Dispensa> getDispense(){
        return dispensaManager.findAll();
    }

    public Dispensa getById(int i){
        return dispensaManager.findById(i);
    }
}

DispensaManager.java

/*
 * To change this template, choose Tools | Templates
 * and open the template in the editor.
 */
package ejb;

import entity.Dispensa;
import facade.DispensaFacadeLocal;
import java.util.List;
import javax.ejb.EJB;
import javax.ejb.Stateless;

/**
 *
 * @author stefano
 */
@Stateless
public class DispensaManager implements DispensaManagerLocal {

    public static final int ASC=0, DESC=1;

    @EJB
    private DispensaFacadeLocal dispensaFacade;

    @Override
    public java.util.List<Dispensa> findByVoto(int order) {
        return (order==DispensaManager.ASC) ? dispensaFacade.findByVotoAsc() : dispensaFacade.findByVotoDesc();
    }

    @Override
    public List findAll() {
        return dispensaFacade.findAll();
    }

    @Override
    public Dispensa findById(int id) {
        return dispensaFacade.find(id);
    }                
}

DispensaFacade.java

package facade;

import entity.Dispensa;
import entity.Post;
import java.util.List;
import javax.ejb.Stateless;
import javax.persistence.EntityManager;
import javax.persistence.PersistenceContext;
import javax.persistence.TypedQuery;
import javax.persistence.criteria.CriteriaBuilder;
import javax.persistence.criteria.CriteriaQuery;
import javax.persistence.criteria.Root;

/**
 *
 * @author stefano
 */
@Stateless
public class DispensaFacade extends AbstractFacade<Dispensa> implements DispensaFacadeLocal {
    @PersistenceContext(unitName = "UNILIFE-ejbPU")
    private EntityManager em;

    @Override
    protected EntityManager getEntityManager() {
        return em;
    }

    public DispensaFacade() {
        super(Dispensa.class);
    }

    @Override
    public List<Dispensa> findByVotoDesc() {
        CriteriaBuilder cb = em.getCriteriaBuilder();
        CriteriaQuery<Dispensa> q = cb.createQuery(Dispensa.class);
        Root<Dispensa> c = q.from(Dispensa.class);
        q.select(c);
        q.where(cb.isNotNull(c.get("datiFile")));
        q.orderBy(cb.desc(c.get("voto")));
        TypedQuery<Dispensa> typedQuery = em.createQuery(q);
        return typedQuery.getResultList();
    }

    @Override
    public java.util.List<Dispensa> findByVotoAsc() {
        CriteriaBuilder cb = em.getCriteriaBuilder();
        CriteriaQuery<Dispensa> q = cb.createQuery(Dispensa.class);
        Root<Dispensa> c = q.from(Dispensa.class);
        q.select(c);
        q.where(cb.isNotNull(c.get("datiFile")));
        q.orderBy(cb.asc(c.get("voto")));
        TypedQuery<Dispensa> typedQuery = em.createQuery(q);
        return typedQuery.getResultList();
    }
}

Dispensa.java

package entity;

import java.io.Serializable;
import java.util.Collection;
import java.util.Date;
import javax.persistence.*;
import javax.validation.constraints.NotNull;
import javax.validation.constraints.Size;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlRootElement;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlTransient;

/**
 *
 * @author stefano
 */
@Entity
@Table(name = "Dispensa")
@XmlRootElement
@NamedQueries({
    @NamedQuery(name = "Dispensa.findAll", query = "SELECT d FROM Dispensa d"),
    @NamedQuery(name = "Dispensa.findById", query = "SELECT d FROM Dispensa d WHERE d.id = :id"),
    @NamedQuery(name = "Dispensa.findByTitolo", query = "SELECT d FROM Dispensa d WHERE d.titolo = :titolo"),
    @NamedQuery(name = "Dispensa.findByDescrizione", query = "SELECT d FROM Dispensa d WHERE d.descrizione = :descrizione"),
    @NamedQuery(name = "Dispensa.findByTag", query = "SELECT d FROM Dispensa d WHERE d.tag = :tag"),
    @NamedQuery(name = "Dispensa.findByData", query = "SELECT d FROM Dispensa d WHERE d.data = :data"),
    @NamedQuery(name = "Dispensa.findByVoto", query = "SELECT d FROM Dispensa d WHERE d.voto = :voto"),
    @NamedQuery(name = "Dispensa.findByNumVoti", query = "SELECT d FROM Dispensa d WHERE d.numVoti = :numVoti"),
    @NamedQuery(name = "Dispensa.findByNumDownloads", query = "SELECT d FROM Dispensa d WHERE d.numDownloads = :numDownloads")})
public class Dispensa implements Serializable {
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
    @Basic(optional = false)
    @NotNull
    @Column(name = "id")
    private Integer id;
    @Basic(optional = false)
    @NotNull
    @Size(min = 1, max = 50)
    @Column(name = "titolo")
    private String titolo;
    @Size(max = 255)
    @Column(name = "descrizione")
    private String descrizione;
    @Size(max = 255)
    @Column(name = "tag")
    private String tag;
    @Basic(optional = true)
    @NotNull
    @Lob
    @Column(name = "datiFile")
    private byte[] datiFile;
    @Basic(optional = false)
    @NotNull
    @Column(name = "data")
    @Temporal(TemporalType.DATE)
    private Date data;
    @Basic(optional = false)
    @NotNull
    @Column(name = "voto")
    private int voto;
    @Basic(optional = false)
    @NotNull
    @Column(name = "numVoti")
    private int numVoti;
    @Basic(optional = false)
    @NotNull
    @Column(name = "numDownloads")
    private int numDownloads;
    @JoinTable(name = "Scaricati", joinColumns = {
        @JoinColumn(name = "dispensa", referencedColumnName = "id")}, inverseJoinColumns = {
        @JoinColumn(name = "utente", referencedColumnName = "username")})
    @ManyToMany(fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
    private Collection<Utente> downloaders;
    @JoinColumn(name = "materia", referencedColumnName = "id")
    @ManyToOne(optional = true)
    private Materia materia;
    @JoinColumn(name = "autore", referencedColumnName = "username")
    @ManyToOne(optional = false)
    private Utente autore;

    public Dispensa() {
    }

    public Dispensa(Integer id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public Dispensa(Integer id, String titolo, byte[] datiFile, Date data, int voto, int numVoti, int numDownloads) {
        this.id = id;
        this.titolo = titolo;
        this.datiFile = datiFile;
        this.data = data;
        this.voto = voto;
        this.numVoti = numVoti;
        this.numDownloads = numDownloads;
    }

    public Integer getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(Integer id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public String getTitolo() {
        return titolo;
    }

    public void setTitolo(String titolo) {
        this.titolo = titolo;
    }

    public String getDescrizione() {
        return descrizione;
    }

    public void setDescrizione(String descrizione) {
        this.descrizione = descrizione;
    }

    public String getTag() {
        return tag;
    }

    public void setTag(String tag) {
        this.tag = tag;
    }

    public byte[] getDatiFile() {
        return datiFile;
    }

    public void setDatiFile(byte[] datiFile) {
        this.datiFile = datiFile;
    }

    public Date getData() {
        return data;
    }

    public void setData(Date data) {
        this.data = data;
    }

    public int getVoto() {
        return voto;
    }

    public void setVoto(int voto) {
        this.voto = voto;
    }

    public int getNumVoti() {
        return numVoti;
    }

    public void setNumVoti(int numVoti) {
        this.numVoti = numVoti;
    }

    public int getNumDownloads() {
        return numDownloads;
    }

    public void setNumDownloads(int numDownloads) {
        this.numDownloads = numDownloads;
    }

    @XmlTransient
    public Collection<Utente> getDownloaders() {
        return downloaders;
    }

    public void setDownloaders(Collection<Utente> utenteCollection) {
        this.downloaders = utenteCollection;
    }

    public Materia getMateria() {
        return materia;
    }

    public void setMateria(Materia materia) {
        this.materia = materia;
    }

    public Utente getAutore() {
        return autore;
    }

    public void setAutore(Utente autore) {
        this.autore = autore;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        int hash = 0;
        hash += (id != null ? id.hashCode() : 0);
        return hash;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object object) {
        // TODO: Warning - this method won't work in the case the id fields are not set
        if (!(object instanceof Dispensa)) {
            return false;
        }
        Dispensa other = (Dispensa) object;
        if ((this.id == null && other.id != null) || (this.id != null && !this.id.equals(other.id))) {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "entity.Dispensa[ id=" + id + " ]";
    }

}

Now, I've faced this problem before with other entities and methods, and I solved it by refreshing the entities, but why should I refresh an entity in this case if I get it from the database everytime that I load the page?

It's just nonsense!

share|improve this question
1  
Have you committed the update in the MySQL workbench? –  JB Nizet May 4 '12 at 15:25
    
Of course I did. In fact I've got the right result if I manually do the query in Workbench, and I've got them in my page only if I redeploy the app :\ –  StepTNT May 4 '12 at 16:07
    
That means that the session has a too long lifetime. When is it opened and closed? –  JB Nizet May 4 '12 at 17:07
    
Where should I look to understand where the session's opened and closed? I never heard something like this! Plus, my bean is ViewScoped so it shouldn't mess with the session! –  StepTNT May 4 '12 at 17:33

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From the code itself it doesn't look like you're doing any explicit caching yourself. @ViewScoped, @RequestScoped and isPostback are all not relevant here, and on the contrary, the purpose of those scopes is actually to do caching, instead of letting the backing bean call through to the service each and every time.

That however is almost the opposite of your problem.

In case you get stale entities from the entity manager, it's almost always a case of an L2 cache. Did you configure any in persistence.xml? Which JPA implementation do you use?

Also important, where and how do you update your data? The code as given doesn't show it. You do mention this "even after changing it with MySql Workbench"

In the case that a JPA Level 2 (L2) cache is used, JPA will get the entities from this cache. Without counter measures, it will track changes to those entities only if they are modified via JPA. If you update the underlying data yourself, either directly via JDBC or via some other external system (like MySql Workbench), JPA will not be aware of those changes.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm using EclipseLink. Actually, changing from <shared-cache-mode>ALL</shared-cache-mode> to <shared-cache-mode>NONE</shared-cache-mode> solved my problem, but I'm afraid that this may influence my session beans. I can set it to <shared-cache-mode>ENABLE_SELECTIVE</shared-cache-mode> but I don't know what this actually does! –  StepTNT May 8 '12 at 18:07
1  
Typically you would specify per Entity whether you want to cache it or not. JPA caching settings would normally not have an effect on session beans. If you update the data directly in your DB, instead of via the entity manager, or if you have multiple machines talking to the same DB which are unaware of each other's cache, you should not use the JPA L2 cache for those entities. –  Arjan Tijms May 8 '12 at 21:45

My instinct is that you have a stale cache of some sort.

Have you read this article?

I would first focus on your Session Bean. Create a test harness without the extra complexity of JSF pages.

I was expecting the default transaction behaviour of your Stateless bean to be "sensible", but I'm now wondering whether using

@TransactionAttribute(TransactionAttributeType.REQUIRED)

might solve your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
The defaults of EJB are sensible and "required" is the default ;) Any way, whether the select query is done in a transaction or not can't make any difference here. –  Mike Braun May 9 '12 at 8:47
    
Agree there's no obvious reason why we should need to ask for Required, but we don't know the whole story. Concerning transactions, perhaps I'm not understanding the article I reference but there do seem to be some transactional effects on cache lifetime. So my first step would be to make doubly sure that I'm in control of transaction duration and then drill down into the JPA settings. –  djna May 9 '12 at 10:57

Most probably this is caused by MySQL's default isolation level which is REPEATABLE READ.

This means that you don't see changes done by other transactions until you end (commit, rollback) your "own" transaction (remember: a SELECT already starts a transaction)

I assume the EJB connection is taken from a connection pool and thus the transactions that are started are never ended properly. Try issuing a commit or rollback before running the select from within your web application.

For a permanent solution you can either change the default isolation by configuring your connection pool (most of them allow this), change the transaction level by calling setTransactionIsolation() on the connection or by changing the default isolation level in MySQL.

share|improve this answer
1  
>Try issuing a commit or rollback before running the select - in an EJB bean you would not normally do that. EJB takes care of managing the transaction. Since the call starts from a non-TX context (the backing bean), the select query fully runs in its own TX. –  Arjan Tijms May 9 '12 at 6:45
1  
It depends on how OP updates his data. If it's also done in EJB without BMT (the default) then there's no concept of having to commit anything. EJB will auto-commit or rollback if the entry method ends. Since OP has the same problem when updating the DB with Workbench AND Workbench is seeing the updated data, I think it's unlikely OP is updating the data in the first place in an EJB that has not committed yet (in general it's indeed a possibility). –  Arjan Tijms May 9 '12 at 6:58
1  
Yes, almost. If that EJB would not end, his application would indeed behave as described. But, then Workbench would also not see the updated data. The entire issue with suspecting a not-committed TX is that OP stated the following: "(Doing the query on Workbench returns correct data!)" Had he not stated that, then a not yet committed TX would indeed be a possible candidate. –  Arjan Tijms May 9 '12 at 7:03
2  
@dextermeyers: thanks, I'm not that familiar with EJBs. But if they always commit or rollback even when only SELECTs are performed, then yes you are right and the isolation level does not come in play here because that would also end the implicit transactions started by a SELECT. A raw connection pool (e.g. C3P0, DBCP) will not do any transaction "cleanup" by default, therefor the connection returned by the application could have a pending transaction. –  a_horse_with_no_name May 9 '12 at 14:53
2  
@a_horse_with_no_name Indeed, that's the purpose of EJB. It doesn't particularly look at what happens inside the method. The EM requests a connection from the pool, and via EJB this is then added to the JTA transaction. At the end of the method, EJB commits if there is no exception, or rollsback if there's either an exception or another resource can't commit (in XA mode). In the extremely rare case that some exception happens exactly during this process, the connection should be marked as bad and the pool should refresh it. You are right that if this doesn't happen, the effect could occur. –  dexter meyers May 9 '12 at 15:36

Are you using hibernate as your EntityManager? If so, it might be using the Session cache, and storing your object. In which case, if you change the data either through SQL or through a different session, you might need to call "refresh" on your object in order to pick up the changes.

share|improve this answer
    
The session cache is the l1, which can't be the problem since the update is supposedly observeable via external tools. The transaction for the select query starts after the data has been updated, and thus a new persistence context (session) starts after that, only queries the data once and then ends the context. It therefor cannot be an L1/Session problem. –  Mike Braun May 9 '12 at 8:52

Have you tried to change your bean to @RequestScoped ?

share|improve this answer
    
I've tried both View and Request, no success. –  StepTNT May 5 '12 at 12:09
    
The scope has nothing to do with the problem, since the code is calling the service every time and not storing anything in the scoped bean. –  Mike Braun May 9 '12 at 9:06

You need know if your page is a postback, http://java.sun.com/javaee/javaserverfaces/1.2/docs/api/javax/faces/render/ResponseStateManager.html

Something like that

ResponseStateManager rsm = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance().getRenderKit().getResponseStateManager();  

if (!rsm.isPostback(FacesContext.getCurrentInstance())) {  

    //do some stuff  
}  
share|improve this answer
    
I'll check it as soon as I've got my laptop with the project. Can you explain why do I need to know if my page is a postback and what I should do in that case? Thanks :) –  StepTNT May 4 '12 at 16:09
    
If you are using JSF there are six phases in JSF life cycle Initial request only passes through:Restore View & Render Response by clicking URL link Post Back is done in all phases viz:Restore View,Apply Request Value,Process Validation,Update Model Values,Invoke Application and Render Response by clicking Submit button. See here for details: download.oracle.com/javaee/1.4/tutorial/doc/JSFIntro10.html –  Lucas_Santos May 4 '12 at 16:16
    
Wait! The problem happens BEFORE viewing data in my JSF Page. The page displays wrong data because the backing bean returns wrong data. But the problem is that the backing bean executes a query everytime the getter is called, so I can't understand why the query returns old values! –  StepTNT May 4 '12 at 16:22
    
Really sorry for the down vote, but I'm afraid your answer really isn't correct Lucas. A postback has nothing to do with this problem. –  Mike Braun May 9 '12 at 9:04

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