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i want to apply the CSS only first li but :first-child apply to all first child of every ul

here is my CODE

#menu-navigation li:first-child{
   color:red;
}​

When applied to this HTML:

<ul class="nav" id="menu-navigation">
<li>Home</li>
<li>About Us
<ul>
    <li>Our Team</li>
</ul>
</li>
</ul>​

...both "Home" and "Our Team" turn red.

share|improve this question
    
Why is it that people constantly say one thing in their question but tag it another? A pseudo-class is a pseudo-class, not a pseudo-element! –  BoltClock May 4 '12 at 15:44
    
'w3schools.com/cssref/sel_firstchild.asp'; check title here –  Jassi Oberoi May 4 '12 at 15:45
7  
-sigh- You just got W3Fooled. :first-child is a pseudo-class, not a pseudo-element. (I don't always post W3Fools comments, but there are times when they're absolutely necessary.) –  BoltClock May 4 '12 at 15:46
3  
Pseudo-classes like li:first-child select the li if it's the first child. (This is similar to classes - li.first selects an li if its class list contains "first"). Pseudo-elements describe different blocks to the element being selected. For example, span:first-letter creates a new block surrounding the first letter of the span, and then selects that –  Gareth May 4 '12 at 15:54
2  
Also note that in CSS3, pseudo-elements should be delimited with a double colon li::first-letter, but this is optional for the pseudo-elements defined in CSS2 (:first-line, :first-letter, :before and :after). That's probably the source of a lot of confusion –  Gareth May 4 '12 at 16:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

use the child selector:

#menu-navigation>li:first-child{
   color:red;
}​

For example: http://jsfiddle.net/w47LD/3/

share|improve this answer
    
i tried it in my code but not showing red color, did you apply in my code –  Jassi Oberoi May 4 '12 at 15:47
    
@Jassi See the fiddle I've added to this answer; only "Home" is red. If this is not the case for you, what browser are you using? IE6? –  Phrogz May 4 '12 at 15:48
    
i am using firefox 12.0 –  Jassi Oberoi May 4 '12 at 15:49
    
@Jassi Looks "correct" to me in FF12 on Windows 7. When I view the link in this answer, only "Home" is red. –  Phrogz May 4 '12 at 15:51
1  
FF12 on OSX. Looks good to me. –  magzalez May 4 '12 at 15:53

Wouldn't it be easier to just use an id/class?

<li class="red"> Our Team </li>

.red
{
  color: red;
}



Alternatively you could use an ID...



<li id="red"> Our Team </li>

#red
{
  color: red;
}
share|improve this answer
    
the whole code comes dynamic –  Jassi Oberoi May 4 '12 at 15:51
3  
Mike, solutions like this run counter to idea of CSS and keeping your style separate from your formatting. If there is a solution to apply a change to bunch of tags without adding extra HTML, that's the route you should go. –  magzalez May 4 '12 at 15:52

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