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I have a few functions that return a 1 if an error is encountered. Each function calls on a lower-level function, such that if the lower-level function returns a 1, the original function returns a 1 as well. Thus errors get passed up the chain in this way.

Here's an highly abridged version of one of these functions:

if (low_level_function()) {
    [do stuff]
    return 1;
}
[do other stuff]
return 0;

Should I instead declare an error variable, assign the result of low_level_function() to it, and then use the error variable in the if() statement? In other words:

int error = low_level_function();
if (error) {
    [do stuff]
    return 1;
}
[do other stuff]
return 0;

Or is there yet another, better way of doing this? I've never coded to account for errors before, so my experience here is rather limited.

Edit: I've reformatted the functions to better convey the nature of my code.

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1  
How about return low_level_function();? If you need stuff between it, int error = low_level_function(); ...; return error;. Many people will agree that return condition; is better than return (condition ? true : false); –  chris May 4 '12 at 15:44
3  
Have you looked at exceptions? –  111111 May 4 '12 at 15:45
    
@111111: the OP probably didn't mean to tag it C++ (judging by the usual C++ and C combined taggings). –  user7116 May 4 '12 at 15:48
    
@sixlettervariables, I don't think that's a good reason not to mention it, if indeed they are using C++. –  chris May 4 '12 at 15:51
    
When I wrote the example code I left out the fact that the function does more than return the error from the low_level_function. The question has been edited to reflect this. –  SharpHawk May 4 '12 at 15:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I dont see the difference between the two approaches above.

I would recomment using exception, much more cleaner approach. why the reinvent the wheel? You can either use standard exception or implement custome exception like

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Ended up using exceptions, as the error-handling hierarchy grew out of control pretty quickly. –  SharpHawk Aug 27 '12 at 20:57

One reason to prefer the second form is when you don't have anything to do in the error case and you want to avoid the stair-step effect of nested if statements.

int error_flag = low_level_function();
if (!error_flag)
    error_flag = second_function();
if (!error_flag)
    error_flag = third_function();
return error_flag;

Of course for that specific example you can really simplify by using the short-circuiting property of ||:

return low_level_function() || second_function() || third_function();
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Your first/upper proposal is my favorite alternative to my own answer ... , although I claim it to be less efficient in case of lots of tests on the error flag. The striaght forward break out of my solotions might help the compiler to understand better whats the author wanted to tell him ... ;-) –  alk May 4 '12 at 19:07

You can use this also,

return low_level_function();

If low_level_function() returns nonzero on error and zero on success. Or

return low_level_function()>0? 1 : 0;
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1  
Technically the second example could be written as return !!low_level_function();. It's more personal preference really. –  chris May 4 '12 at 15:52
    
@chris wow! It's like WOW :D –  Dewsworld May 4 '12 at 15:53

Although it it's s side comment I´ll be first stateing that I prefer one exit for any method.

One major pro tof his construction is the possiblity to only have the need for a error-logging statement at one place.

Also it's very easy to add tracing logs for debugging porpose.

So following this idea I'd propose the following

#define OK (0)

int mid_level_func(....)
{
  log_entry(...);

  int rc = OK

  {
    ...

    if ((rc = low_level_func1(...)))
      goto lblExit;

    ...

    if ((rc = low_level_func2(...)))
      goto lblExit;

    ...

    lblExit:
    ;
  }

  if (OK != rc)
    log_error(rc, ...);

  log_exit(...);

  return rc;
}

For the ones that insist on goto being 'evil' the following variation on the scheme above might help:

#define OK (0)

int mid_level_func(....)
{
  log_entry(...);

  int rc = OK

  do 
  {
    ...

    if ((rc = low_level_func1(...)))
      break;

    ...

    if ((rc = low_level_func2(...)))
      break;

    ...

  } while (0);

  if (OK != rc)
    log_error(rc, ...);

  log_exit(...);

  return rc;
}
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The downvoter might like to explain. –  alk Nov 26 '13 at 17:36

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