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My C program (on Linux) needs to delete a file, say, /home/me/myfile, here is how I do it in my program

...
system ("rm -f /home/me/myfile");
...

When running this program, I got a message saying permission denied. BTW, ls -al /home/me/myfile returns -rw-r--r--

However, under the same user account and in the same shell I execute the C program, I can simple delete the file by typing rm -f /home/me/myfile

What did I miss here?

Thanks,

Update: Using remove(/home/me/myfile) or unlink(/home/me/myfile), the file can be deleted in my program.

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1  
Perhaps it's better to use the unlink function call and get a better error value? –  HonkyTonk May 4 '12 at 16:05
1  
use unlink("/home/me/myfile"); –  Feo May 4 '12 at 16:05
3  
This is likely because (a) you need to specify the full path of /bin/rm, (b) calling system, you are throwing away any diagnostic output generated, and (c) you ignore the system return code. –  Paul Beckingham May 4 '12 at 16:06
    
@PaulBeckingham and that should be your answer. –  Prof. Falken May 4 '12 at 16:08
    
If youre running from the console, then run the output file with sudo –  Dewsworld May 4 '12 at 16:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For a start, it's the permissions on the directory that control whether you can delete a file.

But, having said that, there are numerous things that could be different between the two situations. Your program might be running as a different user (such as with the SETUID bit), the path may be different, leading to a different rm being run, the program may set up a chroot jail so that it can no longer even see the file (though that may manifest as a different error), and so forth. The possibilities are rather large.

However, C provides a call to delete files, called unlink - you should use that in preference and then check errno.

I would suggest checking the output of which rm in both cases, along with the full details of the file and executable, owner and permissions.

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Thanks for @paxdiablo's suggestion. With remove() or unlink(), the problem does go away. But I dont understand "Your program might be running as a different user (such as with the SETUID bit), the path may be different, leading to a different rm being run, the program may set up a chroot jail so that it can no longer even see the file (though that may manifest as a different error), and so forth." My program is very simple, like main(){system("rm -f /home/me/myfile");}, how could those things happen? –  Tom Z May 4 '12 at 16:30

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