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I have a field representing an "Account Number" that is anything but a number most of the time. I need to do some auto-incrementing of these "numbers". Clearly non-ideal for doing math with. The rule that we've decided works for us is that we want to find the right-most group of numbers and auto-increment them by one and return the rebuilt string (even if this makes it one character longer).

Some examples of the numbers are:

  • AC1234 -> AC1235
  • GS3R2C1234 -> GS3R2C1235
  • 1234 -> 1235
  • A-1234 -> A-1235
  • AC1234g -> AC1235g
  • GS3R2C1234g -> GS3R2C1235g
  • 1234g -> 1235g
  • A-1234g -> A-1235g
  • 999 -> 1000
  • GS3R2C9999g -> GS3R2C10000g

I'm working with C#/.NET 4.0. I listed Regex as a tag but that isn't a requirement. This solution need not be in Regular Expressions.

Any thoughts on a good way to do this? Ideal performance isn't a major concern. I'd rather have clear and easy-to-understand/maintain code for this unless it's all wrapped up in a Regex.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
To whomever voted to close this and down-voted me: why? –  Jaxidian May 4 '12 at 16:40

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted
var src = "ap45245jpb1234h";
var match = Regex.Match(src, @"(?<=(\D|^))\d+(?=\D*$)");
if(match.Success)
{
    var number = int.Parse(match.Value) + 1;
    var newNum=string.Format(
      "{0}{1}{2}",
      src.Substring(0,match.Index),
      number,
      src.Substring(match.Index + match.Length));
    newNum.Dump(); //ap45245jpb1235h
}

Explaining the regex: starting either from (the start of the string) or (a non-digit), match one or more digits that are followed by zero or more non-digits then the end of the string.

Of course, if the extracted number has leading zeros, things will go wrong. I'll leave this as an exercise to the reader.

Using a MatchEvaluator (as suggested by @LB in his/her answer) this becomes somewhat lighter:

Regex.Replace(
    src,
    @"(?<=(\D|^))\d+(?=\D*$)",
    m => (int.Parse(m.Value)+1).ToString())
share|improve this answer
    
I like how this Regex identifies the last group of numbers itself instead of leaving that to add'l cumbersome code. –  Jaxidian May 4 '12 at 16:50
    
I'm going with this answer because I feel it has the best balance of functionality in the Regex and C#. This results in a small bit of code that is pretty self-explanatory as long as you can figure out the Regex itself, which isn't overly complex. Thanks! –  Jaxidian May 4 '12 at 19:01

Assuming you don't want to replace 1 digit numbers.

string input = "GS3R2C1234g";
var output = Regex.Replace(input, @"\d{2,}$*", m => (Convert.ToInt64(m.Value) + 1).ToString());
share|improve this answer
    
And supposing the value is GS3333R2C1234g... what happens now? You have 2 matches... should they both be incremented? –  spender May 4 '12 at 16:57
    
No downvote here. I like your use of MatchEvaluator... –  spender May 4 '12 at 16:58
    
Only the last match should be changed. The idea is to try and provide an auto-incrementing account number the best we can. When there are multiple groups of numbers, treat all groups of numbers as static/fixed except for the right-most group. –  Jaxidian May 4 '12 at 17:00
    
While this answer's Regex is incorrect for my needs (as already stated in the above comments), this was a great use of the MatchEvaluator and I did use it in my code. Thank you! –  Jaxidian May 4 '12 at 19:23

If I understand you correctly, you would like to add one to the number which is right-most within a certain string.

You could use Regex as others suggested, but since you are trying to do something very specific, Regex will prove slower than implementing an algorithm just for what you do.

You can test this against the Regex solution, and see for yourself that this will be a lot faster:

I ran both 1 million times and timed it with Stopwatch.

Results:

Regex - 10,808,533 ticks

My way - 253,355 ticks

About 40 times faster!!!

Conclusion: Specific solutions for specific problems.

My way is A LOT faster.

And here's the code:

    // Goes through a string from end to start, looking for the last digit character.
    // It then adds 1 to it and returns the result string.
    // If the digit was 9, it turns it to 0 and continues,
    // So the digit before that would be added with one.
    // Overall, it takes the last numeric substring it finds in the string,
    // And replaces it with itself + 1.
    private static unsafe string Foo(string str)
    {
        var added = false;

        fixed (char* pt = str)
        {
            for (var i = str.Length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
            {
                var val = pt[i] - '0';

                // Current char isn't a digit
                if (val < 0 || val > 9)
                {
                    // Digits have been found and processed earlier
                    if (added)
                    {
                        // Add 1 before the digits,
                        // Because if the code reaches this,
                        // It means it was something like 999,
                        // Which should become 1000
                        str = str.Insert(i + 1, "1");
                        break;
                    }

                    continue;
                }

                added = true;

                // Digit isn't 9
                if (val < 9)
                {
                    // Set it to be itself + 1, and break
                    pt[i] = (char)(val + 1 + '0');
                    break;
                }

                // Digit is 9. Set it to be 0 and continue to previous characters
                pt[i] = '0';

                // Reached beginning of string and should add 1 before digits
                if (i == 0)
                {
                    str = str.Insert(0, "1");
                }
            }
        }

        return str;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Nice job on performance here! :) –  Jaxidian May 4 '12 at 17:02
    
Thanks you. Any reason this isn't chosen as correct answer by now? It is obviously better than the other solutions. –  Yorye Nathan May 4 '12 at 17:12
2  
1) More solutions are still coming in. 2) I've not decided what I think the "best" solution is. Yours may perform much better than the others but the code maintainability is also a factor and I have concerns about whether a junior developer could maintain your solution. It really is a great solution from a perf perspective. But as I originally stated, the performance of the solution is low on my priorities for this solution. –  Jaxidian May 4 '12 at 17:30
1  
I can't see any reason why a jr. developer won't understand this with a little documentation, commenting and maybe better naming. I've added some comment at the beginning to explain the algorithm in general. –  Yorye Nathan May 4 '12 at 17:44
5  
While points/accepted answers are important on SO, that comment about not selecting your answer after only 30 minutes is pretty rude IMO. Common courtesy to the OP is also important on SO (among other things I could respond about your comments...) –  Justin Pihony May 4 '12 at 18:16

You could use a regex like this:

(\d*)

This will group all of the numbers using the Matches method. You can then get the last group and do your modification from that group.

Then you can use the match Index and Length to rebuild your string.

string input = "GS3R2C1234g";
string pattern = @"(\d*)";
var matches = Regex.Matches(input, pattern);
var lastMatch = matches[matches.Length - 1];
var value = int.Parse(lastMatch.Value);
value++;
var newValue = String.Format("{0}{1}{2}"input.Substring(0,lastMatch.Index), 
    value, input.Substring(lastMatch.Index+lastMatch.Length));

I have not put error checking in. I will leave that up to you

share|improve this answer

I suggest the following:

string IncrementAccountNumber(string accountNumber)
{
    var matches = Regex.Matches(accountNumber, @"\d+");
    var lastMatch = matches[matches.Count - 1];
    var number = Int32.Parse(lastMatch.Value) + 1;
    return accountNumber.Remove(lastMatch.Index, lastMatch.Length).Insert(lastMatch.Index, number.ToString());
}
share|improve this answer

If you want a simple Regex that stitches together the result:

private static readonly Regex _ReverseDigitFinder = new Regex("[0-9]+", RegexOptions.RightToLeft);
public static string IncrementAccountNumber(string accountNumber) {
    var lastDigitsMatch = _ReverseDigitFinder.Match(accountNumber);
    var incrementedPart = (Int64.Parse(lastDigitsMatch.Value) + 1).ToString();
    var prefix = accountNumber.Substring(0, lastDigitsMatch.Index);
    var suffix = accountNumber.Substring(lastDigitsMatch.Index + lastDigitsMatch.Length);
    return prefix + incrementedPart + suffix;
}

Notes:

  • It uses the RegexOptions.RightToLeft to start the search at the end and is more efficient that finding all matches and taking the last one.
  • It uses "[0-9]" instead of "\d" to avoid Turkey Test issues.

If you want to use LINQ:

private static readonly Regex _ReverseAccountNumberParser = new Regex("(?<digits>[0-9]+)|(?<nonDigits>[^0-9]+)", RegexOptions.RightToLeft);

public static string IncrementAccountNumber(string accountNumber) {
    bool hasIncremented = false;
    return String.Join("", 
                    _ReverseAccountNumberParser
                        .Matches(accountNumber)
                        .Cast<Match>()
                        .Select(m => {
                            var nonDigits = m.Groups["nonDigits"].Value;
                            if(nonDigits.Length > 0) {
                                return nonDigits;
                            }

                            var digitVal = Int64.Parse(m.Groups["digits"].Value);
                            if(!hasIncremented) {
                                digitVal++;
                            }
                            hasIncremented = true;
                            return digitVal.ToString();
                        })
                        .Reverse());
}

For what it's worth, I accidentally misread this initially and thought you wanted carry bits (i.e. "A3G999 -> A4G000"). This is more interesting and requires carry state:

public static string IncrementAccountNumberWithCarry(string accountNumber) {
    bool hasIncremented = false;
    bool needToCarry = false;
    var result = String.Join("",
                    _ReverseAccountNumberParser
                        .Matches(accountNumber)
                        .Cast<Match>()
                        .Select(m => {
                            var nonDigits = m.Groups["nonDigits"].Value;
                            if (nonDigits.Length > 0) {
                                return nonDigits;
                            }

                            var oldDigitVal = m.Groups["digits"].Value;
                            var digitVal = Int64.Parse(oldDigitVal);

                            if(needToCarry) {
                                digitVal++;
                            }

                            if (!hasIncremented) {
                                digitVal++;
                                hasIncremented = true;
                            }

                            var newDigitVal = digitVal.ToString();
                            needToCarry = newDigitVal.Length > oldDigitVal.Length;
                            if(needToCarry) {
                                newDigitVal = newDigitVal.Substring(1);
                            }

                            return newDigitVal;
                        })
                        .Reverse());
    if(needToCarry) {
        result = "1" + result;
    }

    return result;
}

Test cases:

Debug.Assert(IncrementAccountNumber("AC1234") == "AC1235");
Debug.Assert(IncrementAccountNumber("GS3R2C1234") == "GS3R2C1235");
Debug.Assert(IncrementAccountNumber("1234") == "1235");
Debug.Assert(IncrementAccountNumber("A-1234") == "A-1235");
Debug.Assert(IncrementAccountNumber("AC1234g") == "AC1235g");
Debug.Assert(IncrementAccountNumber("GS3R2C1234g") == "GS3R2C1235g");
Debug.Assert(IncrementAccountNumber("1234g") == "1235g");
Debug.Assert(IncrementAccountNumber("A-1234g") == "A-1235g");
Debug.Assert(IncrementAccountNumber("999") == "1000");
Debug.Assert(IncrementAccountNumber("GS3R2C9999g") == "GS3R2C10000g");
Debug.Assert(IncrementAccountNumberWithCarry("GS3R2C9999g") == "GS3R3C0000g");
Debug.Assert(IncrementAccountNumberWithCarry("999") == "1000");
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. I definitely don't want the ...WithCarry functionality, but that's a fun problem. Now if I can only convince business people that numbers should be 0-9s and maybe some dots. –  Jaxidian May 4 '12 at 17:44

You can try using String.Split. You could use something like:

NameSplit=AccountNumber.split(new Char[] {'a','b','....'z'});

Then you could loop on the array to find the last number (loop from NameSplit.length to 1, first numeric found by Int32.TryParse), increment that number, and then concatenate the array together again with String.Concat.

It would probably be less efficient than RegEx, but I think it would be easier to understand for people who don't understand RegEx..

share|improve this answer
string[] src = { "AC1234", "GS3R2C1234", "1234", "A-1234", "AC1234g",
                 "GS3R2C1234g", "1234g", "A-1234g", "999", "GS3R2C9999g" };
foreach (string before in src)
{
  string after = Regex.Replace(before, @"\d+(?=\D*$)", 
      m => (Convert.ToInt64(m.Value) + 1).ToString());
  Console.WriteLine("{0} -> {1}", before, after); 
}

output:

AC1234 -> AC1235
GS3R2C1234 -> GS3R2C1235
1234 -> 1235
A-1234 -> A-1235
AC1234g -> AC1235g
GS3R2C1234g -> GS3R2C1235g
1234g -> 1235g
A-1234g -> A-1235g
999 -> 1000
GS3R2C9999g -> GS3R2C10000g

notes:

  • @LB's use of lambda expression as MatchEvaluator FTW!

  • From @spender's answer, the lookahead - (?=\D*$) - ensures that only the last group of digits is matched (but the lookbehind - (?<=(\D|^)) - isn't needed).

  • The RightToLeft option as used by @JeffMoser allows it to match the last group of digits first, but there's no static Replace method that allows you to (1) specify RegexOptions, (2) use a MatchEvaluator, and (3) limit the number of replacements. You have to instantiate a Regex object first:

 

string[] src = { "AC1234", "GS3R2C1234", "1234", "A-1234", "AC1234g",
                 "GS3R2C1234g", "1234g", "A-1234g", "999", "GS3R2C9999g" };
foreach (string before in src)
{
  Regex r = new Regex(@"\d+", RegexOptions.RightToLeft);
  string after = r.Replace(before, m => (Convert.ToInt64(m.Value) + 1).ToString(), 1);
  Console.WriteLine("{0} -> {1}", before, after); 
}

output:

AC1234 -> AC1235
GS3R2C1234 -> GS3R2C1235
1234 -> 1235
A-1234 -> A-1235
AC1234g -> AC1235g
GS3R2C1234g -> GS3R2C1235g
1234g -> 1235g
A-1234g -> A-1235g
999 -> 1000
GS3R2C9999g -> GS3R2C10000g
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