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I'm writing a C function for matrix multiplication. It takes two 2D arrays of ints. I could do this if I knew the dimensions of the input arrays, but I'd like to make a more general function.

How to find their dimensions, and how to return an array when I don't know the product's dimensions on compile-time?

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1  
Or do I have to pass the size as a separate argument? –  Andreas May 4 '12 at 16:48
1  
The only way to know is to pass the array dimensions to the function as parameters. –  Mahesh May 4 '12 at 16:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can't find out the dimensions of an array if all you have is a pointer to the beginning of the array. You will need to pass the dimensions of the array to the functions.

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This answer is total overkill, but this is my struct based approach which n.m. called "a whole 'nother story."

If this is a new program (i.e. you get to define what the input / output to your function looks like) and you intend to do a lot of work with matrices, I would be inclined to use a struct to represent a matrix, and just pass around pointers to instances of that struct.

The code below shows one possible approach. Note there are a couple "tricks" going on here. First of all, the data is all stored in a single contiguous block--this is likely to improve performance for a number of reasons. One potential downside to this technique is that resizing a matrix becomes expensive since you have to allocate an entirely new instance and copy data. But if you find that to be a problem, you can always change your implementation, assuming you always use matrix_get() and matrix_set() functions to access values in the matrix.

Also, the matrix struct and the memory that data pointer points to is all allocated in a single malloc call. If you use this technique, just be aware that of data alignment issues. For example, if you change data to point to 64-bit integers or doubles, you'll need to add padding to make sure everything is 8-byte aligned. Alternatively, just malloc the data pointer as a separate array in the new_matrix() function, provided you remember to free it in free_matrix().

I've left as an exercise to the OP to write the multiply function.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct matrix
{
   int   rows;
   int   cols;
   int * data;
};

struct matrix * new_matrix( int rows, int cols )
{
   struct matrix * m = NULL;

   /* Allocate a block of memory large enough to hold the matrix 'header' struct
    * as well as all the row/column data */
   m = malloc( sizeof(struct matrix)  + (rows * cols * sizeof(int) ) );

   if( m )
   {
      m->rows = rows;
      m->cols = cols;

      /* Some ugly pointer math to get to the first byte of data */
      m->data = (int*) ( (char *) m  + sizeof(*m) );
   }
   return m;
}

void free_matrix( struct matrix * m )
{
   free( m );
}

int matrix_set( struct matrix * m, int row, int col, int val)
{
   if( col >= m->cols || row >= m->rows )
      return -1;
   m->data[ m->cols * row + col ] = val;
   return 0;
}

int matrix_get( struct matrix * m, int row, int col, int * val)
{
   if( col >= m->cols || row >= m->rows )
      return -1;
   else 
   {
      *val = m->data[ m->cols * row + col ];
      return  0;
   }
}

void print_matrix( struct matrix * m )
{
   int r,c;
   int val;
   for( r = 0; r < m->rows; r++ )
   {
      for( c = 0; c < m->cols; c++ )
      {
         matrix_get( m, r, c, &val );
         printf( "%5d%s", val, c + 1 < m->cols ? "," : "" );
      }
      printf("\n");
   }
}

int main (int argc, char **argv)
{
   int r,c;
   struct matrix * m = new_matrix( 5, 5 );

   for(  r = 0; r < m->rows; r++ )
   {
      for( c = 0; c < m->cols; c++ )
      {
         matrix_set( m, r, c, (r +1)* 10 + c + 1 );
      }
   }

   print_matrix( m );
   free_matrix( m );
   return 0;
}
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There are no real 2D arrays in C. There are only arrays of arrays, which are not quite the same thing. (I know I will be beaten up for saying this. Bear with me.)

While the difference may seem not very significant, it is. To work with an array, you don't have to know its dimension at compile time. For instance

double dot_product (double a[], double b[], int size); 
/* an A-OK function */

However you must know the size of any array element. For instance

void matrix_product (double a[][], double b[][], double result[][], 
                     int a_rows, int a_cols, int b_cols);
/* Bad, would not compile. You are only permitted to say "double[N][]", 
   where N is known at compile time */

If you want completely general matrix manipulation code, you need to use a plain 1D array, and compute the index out of row and column numbers yourself. You also have to pass the dimensions around.

void matrix_product (double a[], double b[], double result[], 
                     int a_rows, int a_cols, int b_cols) {
  ...
  for (col = 0; col < a_cols; ++col) {
    for (row = 0; row < a_rows; ++row) {
      ...
      ... a[row*a_cols + col] ...
      ...

In this example, the caller allocates result, not the multiplication function.


At some higher level you will want to encapsulate matrices together with their dimensions in some form of abstract matrix data type, like this:

struct matrix {
  double* elements;
  int rows, cols;
};

but that's a whole 'nother story.

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I agree that a single array is the way to go. Dogbert's answer shows the "other" way. See my answer for an example of how to do the encapsulation in a struct. –  Brian McFarland May 4 '12 at 17:45

You are best off creating a MATRIX structure for your array. As @David noted, in C, you have to keep track of the dimensions yourself. There are NO functions built into the language that will do this for you safely.

There are functions like strlen() for strings (ie: char arrays that end with \0), but not for things like arrays and such. The easiest way to keep track of this is by creating your own abstract data type and helper functions.

Try this:

typedef struct matrix {
  int **array;
  int rows;
  int cols;
} matrix_t;


int createMatrix(matrix_t* mtx) {
  int i;
  if (!mtx) {
    printf("INVALID POINTER TO MATRIX");
    return -1;
  }
  if ( (mtx->rows == 0) || (mtx->cols == 0) ) {
    printf("Rows/columns cannot be zero!");
    return -1;
  }
  int status = 0;
  // allocate the array
  mtx->array = (int **)calloc(mtx->rows,sizeof(int*));
  if(mtx->array != NULL) {
    // memory allocation succeeded
    for(i = 0; i < mtx->rows; i++) {
      if((mtx->array[i] = (int*)calloc(mtx->cols,sizeof(int))) == NULL) {
        printf("Memory allocation error");
        status = -1;
        break;
      } else {
        // Allocation successful
      }
    }
  } else {
    printf("Memory allocation error!");
    status = -1;
  }
  return status;
}

int destroyMatrix(matrix_t* mtx) {
  // destroy the array
  for(i = 0; i < mtx->rows; i++) {
    if(mtx->array[i] != NULL) {
      free(mtx->array[i]);
      mtx->array[i] = NULL;
    }
  }
  if(mtx->array) {
    free(mtx->array);
    mtx->array = NULL;
  }
  return 0;
}

Now you can just create a new matrix structure, set its row/column values, call createMatrix, and you are set:

  matrix_t myMtx;
  myMtx.array = NULL;
  myMtx.rows = 3;
  myMtx.cols = myMtx.cols; // Make it a square matrix
  if(createMatrix(&myMtx) == 0 ) {
    printf("Created matrix successfully");
  } else {
    printf("Failed to create matrix!");
  }

These functions also kindly check if memory allocation failed and avoid crashing the program (ie: SEGFAULT) by checking all pointers before using them.

Good luck!

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If you take this approach, I would at least pass the rows & cols params into the createMatrix() since you'll always have to initialize them before you call createMatrix() anyway. –  Brian McFarland May 4 '12 at 17:39
    
Different stylistic choices, it would seem. I prefer the structure be self-contained, and the create function does the appropriate checks. When dealing with large context variables, it makes more sense to keep the function prototypes small and readable as opposed to lengthy, IMHO. –  Dogbert May 6 '12 at 1:28
    
Yeah, I guess that's a good point about keeping the function prototype short & sweet. I was thinking more from the perspective of data hiding / encapsulation. –  Brian McFarland May 8 '12 at 14:35
    
That's a reasonable approach too. I come from more of a C/assembler background, so if something is hidden, the library is prebuilt and public stuff goes in a single header file. C++ and Java are more conducive to data hiding and would allow for a nicer example in this case. –  Dogbert May 8 '12 at 16:18

You will need to pass the dimensions of the arrays. Then you will have to dynamically allocate a third array to hold the result. Once you have calculated the result matrix you can return a pointer to it.

Try something along these lines where A is an n x m matrix and B is an m x p matrix :

int* matix_multiply(int* matrix_a, int* matrix_b, int n, m, int p){

    int *result = (int *) malloc(sizeof(int) * a_rows * b_cols);
    if(result == NULL)
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    //loops to do the actual multiplication and store the results in result[i][j]
    return result; //returns the result array
}
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