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I am trying to figure out why one of my doctrine finds is running so slow. I don't really know where to start, so please bear with me.

I do a pretty basic find to fetch a user object. This find is taking ~160ms. When I run the query via phpmyadmin, it takes .7ms.

$this->em->find('Entities\User', $userId)

I have already tried adding skip-name-resolve to mysql's my.cnf. The id field in the user table is indexed. I really don't know what else to try. Let me know if there is additional information I can provide.

Below is the entity file:

namespace Entities;
use Doctrine\Common\Collections\ArrayCollection;
use Doctrine\ORM\EntityRepository;

/** @Entity(repositoryClass = "Entities\UserRepository")
  * @Table(name="user") 
  */
class User extends \Company_Resource_AbstractEntity
{
    /** @Id @Column(type="integer") @GeneratedValue */
    protected $id;
    /** @Column(type="string") */
    protected $name;
    /** @Column(type="string") */
    protected $password;
    /** @Column(type="string") */
    protected $email;
    /** @Column(type="string") */
    protected $first_name;
    /** @Column(type="string") */
    protected $last_name;
    /** @Column(type="integer") */
    protected $password_reset;
    /** @Column(type="string") */
    protected $salt;
    /** @Column(type="integer") */
    protected $active;
    /** @Column(type="string") */
    protected $cookie_hash;

    /**
    * @ManyToOne(targetEntity="Company" , inversedBy="user")
    */
    protected $company;

    /**
    * @ManyToOne(targetEntity="Privilege" , inversedBy="user")
    */
    protected $privilege;

    /**
    * @OneToMany(targetEntity="CompanySubscription" , mappedBy="user")
    */
    protected $subscription;

    /**
    * @OneToMany(targetEntity="EquipmentEvent" , mappedBy="check_in_user")
    */
    protected $check_in;

    /**
    * @OneToMany(targetEntity="EquipmentEvent" , mappedBy="check_out_user")
    */
    protected $check_out;

    /**
    * @OneToMany(targetEntity="GroupEvent" , mappedBy="check_in_user")
    */
    protected $check_in_group;

    /**
    * @OneToMany(targetEntity="GroupEvent" , mappedBy="check_out_user")
    */
    protected $check_out_group;

    /**
    * @OneToMany(targetEntity="Maintenance" , mappedBy="submit_user")
    */
    protected $maintenance_submit;

    /**
    * @OneToMany(targetEntity="Maintenance" , mappedBy="completed_user")
    */
    protected $maintenance_complete;

    /**
    * @OneToMany(targetEntity="UserLogin" , mappedBy="user")
    */
    protected $login;
}

Abstract entity:

use \Doctrine\Common\Collections\ArrayCollection;

abstract class Company_Resource_AbstractEntity implements ArrayAccess
{
    public function offsetExists($offset)
    {
        return property_exists($this, $offset);
    }

    // The get/set functions should check to see if an appropriately named function exists before just returning the
    // property.  This way classes can control how data is returned from the object more completely.
    public function offsetGet($offset)
    {
        $property = new Zend_Filter_Word_UnderscoreToCamelCase();
        $method = 'get'. $property->filter($offset);
        return $this->{$method}();
    }

    public function offsetSet($offset, $value)
    {
        $property = new Zend_Filter_Word_UnderscoreToCamelCase();
        $method = 'set'. $property->filter($offset);
        return $this->{$method}($value);
    }

    public function offsetUnset($offset)
    {
        // can't do this
    }

    /*==-====-====-====-====-====-====-====-====-====-====-==*/

    /*
     * Provides magic method access for getFieldName() and setFieldName()
     * where field_name is a simple field and not a relation
     * A special getData implementation returns all of the current object vars
     */
    public function __call($method, $arguments)
    {
        preg_match('@^([a-z]+)(.*)@', $method, $matches);
        $action = $matches[1];
        $property = $matches[2];
        $underscore = new Zend_Filter_Word_CamelCaseToUnderscore();
        $offset = strtolower($underscore->filter($property));
        if ($action == 'get')
        {
            if ($property == 'Data')
                return get_object_vars($this);
            if ($this->offsetExists($offset))
                return $this->{$offset};
            else
                throw new Zend_Exception(sprintf("'%s' does not have property '%s'", get_class($this), $offset));
        }
        else if ($action == 'set')
        {
            if ($this->offsetExists($offset))
                return $this->{$offset} = $arguments[0];
            else
                throw new Zend_Exception(sprintf("'%s' does not have property '%s'", get_class($this), $offset));
        }
        else
            throw new Zend_Exception(sprintf("'%s' does not have method '%s'", get_class($this), $method));
    }
}

The SQL that the find produces:

SELECT t0.id AS id1, 
t0.name AS name2, 
t0.password AS password3, 
t0.email AS email4, 
t0.first_name AS first_name5, 
t0.last_name AS last_name6, 
t0.password_reset AS password_reset7, 
t0.salt AS salt8, 
t0.active AS active9, 
t0.cookie_hash AS cookie_hash10, 
t0.company_id AS company_id11, 
t0.privilege_id AS privilege_id12 
FROM user t0 WHERE t0.id = ?

Anyone see anything wrong or know where to go further with this?

Using Doctrine 2.2.2.

The explain I get when I run that query with phpmyadmin: http://i.imgur.com/wWeGO.png

The table schema: http://i.imgur.com/BQsRX.jpg

share|improve this question
3  
If I were you, I would enable query logging, with it you can tail the query log file and see the exact queries being executed. Perhaps there is something happening behind the scenes you are unaware of. You didn't tag a RDBMS, but I am assuming MySQL? If so you can enable query logging using the steps outlined here: melikedev.com/2012/03/22/mysql-enable-query-logging. Once you find the query, I would run it from MySQL command line and see if there is a performance difference, and also tune the schema to improve performance. –  Mike Purcell May 4 '12 at 16:57
1  
You would actually run those commands from the MySQL command line. Basically, I don't think it's a code issue that is causing your slowness, I think it's database/schema related. So I wanted to remove that as a distractor first before we tear apart your code. –  Mike Purcell May 4 '12 at 17:17
2  
Ahhh that makes sense. Ya try logging at the app level. I built an app using Symfony/Doctrine and found out that it was running upwards of 30 queries per form save. Only after tailing the query logs was I able to optimize the queries/structure so form saves are much faster and less impacting on the database. ORMS are great, but if not used correctly can really wreck havoc on performance. –  Mike Purcell May 4 '12 at 17:30
1  
The query looks like any other standard query. The next step is table schema, any chance you can post that? And if you wouldn't mind, can you post the explain against the query that doctrine gave you? –  Mike Purcell May 5 '12 at 5:49
1  
Wow, schema is good, except for the int(1), I usually use tinyint(1). Not sure what the A means for collation in the indices section, but I don't think it matters. The explain is also good. Can you post the schema.yml file generated from the schema? –  Mike Purcell May 5 '12 at 6:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe the problem with my setup was the actual number of lines in the file. Doctrine was reading through those every time. I enabled APC for the meta-cache and load time decreased dramatically after the first load. Without query or result cache, that query ACTUALLY only takes about 6 MS which is what I was aiming for all along. Wish I would have tried that sooner.

share|improve this answer
1  
Are you saying that you think the slowness is caused due to the size of the file during compilation time? APC is op-code caching and only helps in that the file doesn't need to be compiled on subsequent requests. I doubt that this is the cause of your slowness, but if it worked for you... –  Mike Purcell May 8 '12 at 16:52
    
I really don't know what else it could be. –  tubaguy50035 May 8 '12 at 18:27
1  
If you had a dev environment, you could tail the query log as I mentioned in comments, then you will see every query executed for each request. I suspect your intuition may be correct, it is one of the relationships that is causing the slowness. –  Mike Purcell May 8 '12 at 19:44

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