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After-edit: Wow, this question go long. Please forgive =\

I am creating a new table consisting of over 30 columns. These columns are largely populated by selections made from dropdown lists and their options are largely logically related. For example, a dropdown labeled Review Period will have options such as Monthly, Semi-Annually, and Yearly. I came up with a workable method to normalize these options down to numeric identifiers by creating a primitives lookup table that stores values such as Monthly, Semi-Annually, and Yearly. I then store the IDs of these primitives in the table of record and use a view to join that table out to my lookup table. With this view in place, the table of record can contain raw data that only the application understands while allowing external applications and admins to run SQL against the view and return data that is translated into friendly information.

It just got complicated. Now these dropdown lists are going to have non-logically-related items. For example, the Review Period dropdown list now needs to have options of NA and Manual. This blows my entire grouping scheme out of the water.

Similar constructs that have been used in this application have resorted to storing repeated string values across multiple records. This means you could have hundreds of records with the string 'Monthly' stored in the table's ReviewPeriod column. The thought of this happening has made me cringe since I've started working here, but now I am starting to think that non-normalized data may be the best option here.

The only other way I can think of doing this using my initial method while allowing it to be dynamic and support the constant adding of new options to any dropdown list at any time is this: When saving the data to the database, iterate through every single property of my business object (.NET class in this case) and check for any string value that exists in the primitives table. If it doesn't, add it and return the auto-generated unique identifier for storage in the table of record. It seems so complicated, but is this what one is to go through for the sake of normalized data?

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Anything is possible. Nobody is going to haul you off to denormalization jail and revoke your DBA card. I would say that you should know the rules and what breaking them means. Once you have those in hand, it's up to your and your best judgement to do what you think is best.

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+1 Denormalization jail!! –  oscilatingcretin May 4 '12 at 18:16

I came up with a workable method to normalize these options down to numeric identifiers by creating a primitives lookup table that stores values such as Monthly, Semi-Annually, and Yearly. I then store the IDs of these primitives in the table of record and use a view to join that table out to my lookup table.

Replacing text with ID numbers has nothing at all to do with normalization. You're describing a choice of surrogate keys over natural keys. Sometimes surrogate keys are a good choice, and sometimes surrogate keys are a bad choice. (More often a bad choice than you might believe.)

This means you could have hundreds of records with the string 'Monthly' stored in the table's ReviewPeriod column. The thought of this happening has made me cringe since I've started working here, but now I am starting to think that non-normalized data may be the best option here.

Storing the string "Monthly" in multiple rows has nothing to do with normalization. (Or with denormalization.) This seems to be related to the notion that normalization means "replace all text with id numbers". Storing text in your database shouldn't make you cringe. VARCHAR(n) is there for a reason.

The only other way I can think of doing this using my initial method while allowing it to be dynamic and support the constant adding of new options to any dropdown list at any time is this: When saving the data to the database, iterate through every single property of my business object (.NET class in this case) and check for any string value that exists in the primitives table. If it doesn't, add it and return the auto-generated unique identifier for storage in the table of record.

Let's think about this informally for a minute.

Foreign keys provide referential integrity. Their purpose is to limit the values allowed in a column. Informally, the referenced table provides a set of valid values. Values that aren't in that table aren't allowed in the referencing column of other tables.

But no matter what the user types in, you're going to add it to that table of valid values.

If you're going to accept everything the user types in the first place, why use a foreign key at all?

The main problem here is that you've been poorly served by the people who taught you (mis-taught you) the relational model. (And, probably, equally poorly by the people who taught you SQL.) I hope you can unlearn those mistaken notions quickly, and soon make real progress.

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