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This construct is pretty common in perl:

opendir (B,"/somedir") or die "couldn't open dir!";

But this does not seem to work:

opendir ( B, "/does-not-exist " ) or {
    print "sorry, that directory doesn't exist.\n";
    print "now I eat fugu.\n";
    exit 1;
};

Is it possible for the "or" error-handling to have more than one command?

Compiling the above:

# perl -c test.pl
syntax error at test.pl line 5, near "print"
syntax error at test.pl line 7, near "}"
test.pl had compilation errors.
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1  
Error prints should be sent to STDERR, and you should use die instead of print+exit. –  ikegami May 4 '12 at 18:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can always use do:

opendir ( B, "/does-not-exist " ) or do {
    print "sorry, that directory doesn't exist.\n";
    print "now I eat fugu.\n";
    exit 1;
}

Or you can use if/unless:

unless (opendir ( B, "/does-not-exist " )) {
    print "sorry, that directory doesn't exist.\n";
    print "now I eat fugu.\n";
    exit 1;
}

Or you can swing together your own subroutine:

opendir ( B, "/does-not-exist " ) or fugu();

sub fugu {
    print "sorry, that directory doesn't exist.\n";
    print "now I eat fugu.\n";
    exit 1;
}

There is more than one way to do it.

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The "more regular" doesn't work, for example, if one uses open(my $B, ...). –  ikegami May 4 '12 at 18:25
    
@ikegami Well, it does work, it just won't be very productive. With global file handle, it shouldn't matter. –  TLP May 4 '12 at 18:33
    
@TLP apart from the scope issue, why do you consider the "unless" solution not recommended? –  Bill Ruppert May 4 '12 at 19:27
    
@bill mostly because of scope. –  TLP May 4 '12 at 19:44

Exception handling in Perl is done with eval()

eval {
    ...
} or do {
    ...Use $@ to handle the error...
};
share|improve this answer
    
open doesn't die, it just returns undef. There's nothing to catch using eval. –  chepner May 4 '12 at 19:42

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