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The following code snippet gives unexpected output in Turbo C++ compiler:

     char a[]={'a','b','c'};
     printf("%s",a);

Why doesn't this print abc? In my understanding, strings are implemented as one dimensional character arrays in C.
Secondly, what is the difference between %s and %2s?

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2  
This case is pretty obvious, but in the future it would help to tell us what the program is doing (other than "not working") in addition to what you expect it to do; otherwise we can only guess as to what the problem may be. –  John Bode May 4 '12 at 19:30

4 Answers 4

This is because your string is not zero-terminated. This will work:

char a[]={'a','b','c', '\0'};

The %2s specifies the minimum width of the printout. Since you are printing a 3-character string, this will be ignored. If you used %5s, however, your string would be padded on the left with two spaces.

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char a[]={'a','b','c'};

Well one problem is that strings need to be null terminated:

char a[]={'a','b','c', 0};
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Because you aren't using a string. To be considered as a string you need the 'null termination': '\0' or 0 (yes, without quotes).

You can achieve this by two forms of initializations:

char a[] = {'a', 'b', 'c', '\0'};

or using the compiler at your side:

char a[] = "abc";
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That zero escaped with a backslash is perfectly fine, it represents (char)0, which terminates the string. I don't see the reason for downvoting. +1. –  user529758 May 4 '12 at 19:43

Without change the original char-array you can also use

     char a[]={'a','b','c'};
     printf("%.3s",a);
or
     char a[]={'a','b','c'};
     printf("%.*s",sizeof(a),a);
or
     char a[]={'a','b','c'};
     fwrite(a,3,1,stdout);
or
     char a[]={'a','b','c'};
     fwrite(a,sizeof(a),1,stdout);
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