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Right now my class looks like this:

private boolean hungry;
private boolean sleepy;
private boolean happy;

...

private setState(List<KeyValuePair> pairs) {
   for (KeyValuePair pair : pairs) {
       String key = pair.getKey();
       String value = pair.getValue();

       if (key.equals("hunger") && value.equals("Y")) hungry = true;
       if (key.equals("tired") && value.equals("Y")) sleepy=true;
       if (key.equals("sad") && value.equals("N")) happy = true;
   }
}

This is fine but is very dependent on this specific conditional logic. Unfortunately I cannot change the KeyValuePair idea (it is external)

What is a more robust way to have a (key,value) pair set an appropriate variable to true? (always to true, never false)

I'd like this to be easily readible + extensible.

The only thing I can think of is making a Map<Map<String,String>,String>, which kind of sucks, especially since I will have to statically construct at runtime.

Any ideas?

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5 Answers 5

How about:

private setState(List<KeyValuePair> pairs) {
   for (KeyValuePair pair : pairs) {
       String key = pair.getKey();
       String value = pair.getValue();

       hungry = (key.equals("hunger") && value.equals("Y")) || hungry;
       sleepy = (key.equals("tired") && value.equals("Y")) || sleepy;
       happy = (key.equals("sad") && value.equals("N")) || happy;
   }
}

If it any of the states ever evaluate to true it will be stay true regardless of the other iterations. In terms of making this more simple (removing the logic) I don't see how you could do that given that you have a strange mixture of a map and a list there.

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You should've written hungry |= key.equals("hunger") && value.equals("Y"); –  Marko Topolnik May 4 '12 at 20:08
    
... eveb better with Yoda conditions like "hunger".equals(key) - guards against NPE –  Konstantin Pribluda May 4 '12 at 20:13
    
@MarkoTopolnik I don't find that very clear so I choose never to write boolean operators like that. Style choice. –  BeRecursive May 4 '12 at 21:53
    
@KonstantinPribluda Yes that's actually quite a good point, hadn't thought of that –  BeRecursive May 4 '12 at 21:54
    
Such condition can actually save you another equals operator. For example if you like to compare string value with constant –  Konstantin Pribluda May 5 '12 at 11:57

I don't think there's anything particularly wrong with the conditional logic. It's clear and concise.

One possibility is to try and turn this into some kind of data-driven design, but I doubt that would buy much, given that the variables you set (hungry et al) have to be known at compile time.

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After reading these answers, I'm pretty sure I agree with you. –  Jeremy May 4 '12 at 19:58

First of all, I would create an enum to represent the states, after all that's what they're made for. That alone would make things cleaner, but if you really want to make it more extensible, I'd create an abstract StateResolver class. It would be extended by HungerStaterResolver, SleepStateResolver and HappynessStateResolver. Then these guys would have a resolve method which would give me a resulting state based on my input. Really, it's extensible but you have to consider that you'll be creating a hierarchy and that has it's own implications too.

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Just for the fun:

import java.util.Comparator;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.SortedSet;
import java.util.TreeSet;

public class State
{
  public static class KeyValuePair
  {
    private final String key;
    private final String value;

    public KeyValuePair( String key, String value )
    {
      super();
      this.key = key;
      this.value = value;
    }

    public String getKey()
    {
      return this.key;
    }

    public String getValue()
    {
      return this.value;
    }

  }

  public boolean setState( List<KeyValuePair> pairs )
  {
    //
    boolean happy = false;

    //
    final Comparator<KeyValuePair> comparator = new Comparator<KeyValuePair>()
    {
      @Override
      public int compare( KeyValuePair o1, KeyValuePair o2 )
      {
        int compareTo = o1.getKey().compareTo( o2.getKey() );
        if ( compareTo == 0 )
        {
          compareTo = o1.getValue().compareTo( o2.getValue() );
        }
        return compareTo;
      }
    };
    final SortedSet<KeyValuePair> matchingKeyValuePairSet = new TreeSet<KeyValuePair>( comparator );
    matchingKeyValuePairSet.add( new KeyValuePair( "hunger", "Y" ) );
    matchingKeyValuePairSet.add( new KeyValuePair( "tired", "Y" ) );
    matchingKeyValuePairSet.add( new KeyValuePair( "sad", "N" ) );

    for ( KeyValuePair pair : pairs )
    {
      happy |= matchingKeyValuePairSet.contains( pair );
    }

    //
    return happy;

  }

}

JUnit testcase:

import static org.junit.Assert.assertFalse;
import static org.junit.Assert.assertTrue;

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;

import org.junit.Test;

public class StateTest
{
  private State state = new State();

  @Test
  public void testSetState()
  {
    {
      final List<State.KeyValuePair> pairs = Arrays.asList( new State.KeyValuePair( "hunger", "Y" ) );
      assertTrue( this.state.setState( pairs ) );
    }
    {
      final List<State.KeyValuePair> pairs = Arrays.asList( new State.KeyValuePair( "hunger", "N" ) );
      assertFalse( this.state.setState( pairs ) );
    }
    {
      final List<State.KeyValuePair> pairs = Arrays.asList( new State.KeyValuePair( "hunger", "N" ),
                                                            new State.KeyValuePair( "sad", "N" ) );
      assertTrue( this.state.setState( pairs ) );
    }
  }

}
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This is the best most strangely hilarious thing I have ever seen. This reminds me of the old joke about how a senior developer writes hello world. –  Jeremy May 4 '12 at 20:04
    
@Jeremy :-> yes, but he does it in less than 2 min and he can extend it with for the next generations of the app. (And no one can read it :-) –  Omnaest May 4 '12 at 20:05

There's a fair chance your KeyValuePair implements equals. If that is so, you can write

final KeyValuePair kvHungry = new KeyValuePair("hunger", "Y");
boolean hungry = false;
for (KeyValuePair pair : pairs) hungry |= pair.equals(kvHungry);

And ditto for the others.

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