Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a delegate with a generic type as one of the parameters:

public delegate void UpdatedPropertyDelegate<T>(
    RemoteClient callingClient, 
    ReplicableProperty<T> updatedProp, 
    ReplicableObject relevantObject
);

Now, I want a public event that can be subscribed to for other classes to use. Therefore, I did:

public event UpdatedPropertyDelegate<T> UpdatedProperty;

However, the compiler doesn't like that. I don't understand why T has to be specified here. Surely it's specified when I fire the event, i.e.:

if (UpdatedProperty != null) 
{
    UpdatedProperty(this, readProperty, 
        ReplicableObjectBin.GetObjectByID(readProperty.OwnerID));
}

So, am I doing something simple wrong? Or is this a massive failure of understanding?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
3  
The compiler isn't going to accept a property with an unknown generic type that can't be known until runtime. –  BoltClock May 4 '12 at 19:44
    
What do you expect that to mean? –  SLaks May 4 '12 at 19:45
    
I want to pass a generic parameter in the event. That's all. Surely if I knew what the type T would be at compile time I wouldn't need to use generics at all? –  Motig May 4 '12 at 19:46
    
Generics are a compile-time feature. What you're looking for is "dynamic". –  Asik May 4 '12 at 19:49
    
@Motig .NET generics are not dynamic. They are always checked at compile time. –  Chris Shain May 4 '12 at 19:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It sounds like what you need is an interface type, rather than a delegate. Interface methods can accept open generic types (which is what you're after), even though delegates cannot. For example, one could define something like:

interface ActOnConstrainedThing<CT1,CT2>
{
  void Act<MainType>(MainType param) where MainType: CT1,CT2;
}

Even if implementers of CT1 and CT2 do not share a common base type which also implements CT1 and CT2, an implementation of Act may use its passed-in parameter as a CT1 or CT2 without typecast, and could even pass it to routines which expect a generic parameter with CT1 and CT2 constraints. Such a thing would not be possible with delegates.

Note that using interfaces rather than delegates means that one cannot use the normal "event" mechanism and syntax. Instead, the object which would be an event publisher must maintain a list of object instances that implement the desired interface (e.g. a List<ActOnConstrainedThing<IThis,IThat>>) , and enumerate the instances on that list (perhaps using foreeach). For example:

List<IActOnConstrainedThing<IThis,IThat>> _ActOnThingSubscribers;

void ActOnThings<T>(T param) where T:IThis,IThat
{
  foreach(var thing in _ActOnThingSubscribers)
  {
    thing.Act<T>(param);
  }
}

Edit/Addendum

The place where I employed this pattern also had some other stuff that didn't seem overly relevant to the question, which by my interpretation was asking how one can have a delegate (or equivalent) with an open type parameter, so that the object invoking the delegate-equivalent can supply the type parameter, without the object supplying the delegate having to know it in advance. Most cases where this is useful involve generic constraints, but since that was apparently introducing confusion, here's an example that doesn't:

interface IShuffleFiveThings
{
  void Shuffle<T>(ref T p1, ref T p2, ref T p3, ref T p4, ref T p5);
}
List<IShuffleFiveThings _ShuffleSubscribers;

void ApplyShuffles<T>(ref T p1, ref T p2, ref T p3, ref T p4, ref T p5)
{
  foreach(var shuffler in _ShuffleSubscribers)
  {
    thing.Shuffle(ref p1, ref p2, ref p3, ref p4, ref p5);
  }
}

The IShuffleFiveThings.Shuffle<T> method takes five parameters by ref and does something with them (most likely permutes them in some fashion; perhaps permuting them randomly, or perhaps permuting some randomly while leaving others where they are. If one has a list IShuffleFiveThings, the things in that list can be used efficiently, without boxing or Reflection, to manipulate any kind of thing (including both class types and value types). By contrast, if one were to use delegates:

delegate void ActOn5RefParameters(ref p1, ref p2, ref p3, ref p4, ref p5);

then because any particular delegate instance can only act upon a single parameter type supplied at its creation (unless it's an open delegate which is called only via Reflection), one would need to create a separate list of delegates for every type of object one wished to shuffle (yes, I know one would normally handle permutations by using an array of integer indices; I chose permutation as an operation because it's applicable to all object types, not because this particular method of permuting things is useful).

Note that because the type T in IShuffleFiveThings does not have any constraints, implementations won't be able to do much with it except by typecasting (which may introduce boxing). Adding constraints to such parameters makes them much more useful. While it would be possible to hard-code such constraints within the interface, that would limit the interface's usefulness to applications requiring those particular constraints. Making the constraints themselves generic avoids that restriction.

share|improve this answer
    
This is interesting. In the OP question, would this interface be implemented by type that was defining his event or would this be implemented by the type being passed in the event? Basically, how would this be used in the OP solution? –  Jim May 4 '12 at 20:24
    
@Jim: See above edit. One can't use events, but one can achieve similar effects with interfaces. The pattern used by IObservable/IObserver may be a good alternative to using events. –  supercat May 4 '12 at 21:03
    
@supercate - Right I get the observer pattern here but wouldn't the enclosing type still have to define IThis, IThat type parameters or it itself also specify these same type parameters? –  Jim May 4 '12 at 21:14
1  
@supercat I don't see how this is any less defined than using events/delegates. I would be very interested in some more thorough code samples. upvote ready for the giving if you can elaborate. I have tried the code and the generic arguments feel just as defined as they do on the events. Thanks. –  payo May 4 '12 at 21:47
1  
You are missing the point. Our issue with your answer was that you haven't shown the argument can be IThis OR IThat, it must be both in your code sample. Perhaps that was a typo and you didn't mean to say that. Also, You've missed the point of the OP's question (ironically, you were selected for the answer). In your solution - ActOnConstrainedThing will be subclassed for each pair of contraints the user wants. Using a delegate/event is no less flexible, you simple create multiple types - one for each need as well. [too much text, see next comment] –  payo May 4 '12 at 23:22

You're in essence creating an instance of that delegate. Instances need to have their generic types defined.

The definition of your delegate can contain T, but your instance needs to define which T.

share|improve this answer
2  
Or be in a generic class that define T –  payo May 4 '12 at 19:47
    
So, is there any way to pass a generic parameter in an event (without specifying the type T at compile time, which seems to take away the point of a generic to me)? –  Motig May 4 '12 at 19:47
    
True, in that case T is defined by the class instance, so the delegate instance is also defined, which holds with what I stated. –  Jean-Bernard Pellerin May 4 '12 at 19:48

Given this example:

public delegate void FooDelegate<T>(T value);

public class FooContainer
{
    public event FooDelegate<T> FooEvent;
}

The compiler as in your example does not like the FooEvent declaration because T is not defined. However, changing FooContainer to

public delegate void FooDelegate<T>(T value);

public class FooContainer<T>
{
    public event FooDelegate<T> FooEvent;
}

And now the compiler is ok with this because whoever creates instances of FooContainer will now have to specify type T like so

FooContainer<string> fooContainer = new FooFooContainer<string>();

However you could also constrain T to an interface like this.

public delegate void FooDelegate<T>(T value) where T : IFooValue;

public class FooContainer
{
    public event FooDelegate<IFooValue> FooEvent;

    protected void OnFooEvent(IFooValue value)
    {
        if (this.FooEvent != null)
            this.FooEvent(value);
    }
}

public interface IFooValue
{
    string Name { get; set; }// just an example member
}

In this case, you can raise the event with types as long as they implement the interface IFooValue.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.