Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I want to simulate keydown events on a given textarea element in an html page. Since I am using chrome, I called initKeyboardEvent on my variable and I passed the keyCode I want to type into the textarea. Here is what I tried:

var keyEvent = document.createEvent('KeyboardEvent');
keyEvent.initKeyboardEvent('keydown', true, false, null, 0, false, 0, false, 77, 0);
inputNode.dispatchEvent(keyEvent);

In this code I'm typing the letter m however the textarea is only getting the keyCode 13 which is the Enter key. So, I tried an override code I saw online that sets the value to keyCodeVal, but with no success

var keyEvent = document.createEvent('KeyboardEvent');
Object.defineProperty(keyEvent, 'keyCode', { 
                         get : function() {
                                 return this.keyCodeVal;
                         }
                        });
keyEvent.initKeyboardEvent('keydown', true, false, null, 0, false, 0, false, 77, 0);
keyEvent.keyCodeVal = 77;
inputNode.dispatchEvent(keyEvent);

Does anyone have an idea how to set the keyCode value?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 45 down vote accepted

So very very close...

You just needed to override the 'which' property. Here's some sample code:

Podium = {};
Podium.keydown = function(k) {
    var oEvent = document.createEvent('KeyboardEvent');

    // Chromium Hack
    Object.defineProperty(oEvent, 'keyCode', {
                get : function() {
                    return this.keyCodeVal;
                }
    });     
    Object.defineProperty(oEvent, 'which', {
                get : function() {
                    return this.keyCodeVal;
                }
    });     

    if (oEvent.initKeyboardEvent) {
        oEvent.initKeyboardEvent("keydown", true, true, document.defaultView, false, false, false, false, k, k);
    } else {
        oEvent.initKeyEvent("keydown", true, true, document.defaultView, false, false, false, false, k, 0);
    }

    oEvent.keyCodeVal = k;

    if (oEvent.keyCode !== k) {
        alert("keyCode mismatch " + oEvent.keyCode + "(" + oEvent.which + ")");
    }

    document.dispatchEvent(oEvent);
}

Sample usage:

Podium.keydown(65);

Note: this code is not designed to work in IE, Safari, or other browsers. Well, maybe with Firefox. YMMV.

share|improve this answer
7  
+1 This is the only working solution on this Stackoverflow.com –  Sungguk Lim Jul 29 '12 at 10:21
3  
Does not seem to work anymore. Alternative suggested. –  Philip Nuzhnyy Sep 21 '12 at 0:27
1  
It works fine for me, Version 21.0.1180.89. Note depressed key in virtual keyboard - nt4.com/ss/keydown-65.png. Perhaps you misunderstand exactly what it's doing. Whilst I appreciate your concerns, they are outside the scope of the original question. @sunglim:thanks for noticing :) freeall: where to begin... "Facebook Automation", "TextArea vs Input", "KeyX Events vs Changing HTML Content"... all out of scope. everyone else - this triggers events, it doesn't type for you. –  Orwellophile Sep 24 '12 at 13:35
1  
The getters can simply return k. There's no need to attach a keyCodeVal property to the event object. –  davidchambers Jul 31 '13 at 23:19
2  
Does not work in Chrome 33.0.1750.154. –  drusepth Apr 5 '14 at 21:05

Orwellophile's solution does work.

  • First: 'keyCode', 'charCode' and 'which' is readonly in Safari and IE9+ (at least).
  • Second: initKeyboardEvent is kind of messy. All browsers implement it in a different way. Even in webkit's there are several different implementation of initKeyboardEvent. And there is no "good" way to initKeyboardEvent in Opera.
  • Third: initKeyboardEvent is deprecated. You need to use initKeyEvent or KeyboardEvent constructor.

Here I wrote a cross-browser initKeyboardEvent function (gist):

Example:

var a = window.crossBrowser_initKeyboardEvent("keypress", {"key": 1, "char": "!", shiftKey: true})
alert(a.type + " | " + a.key + " | " + a.char + " | " + a.shiftKey)

And here is my DOM Keyboard Event Level 3 polyfill with cross-browser KeyboardEvent constructor.

Example:

var a = new KeyboardEvent("keypress", {"key": 1, "char": "!", shiftKey: true})
alert(a.type + " | " + a.key + " | " + a.char + " | " + a.shiftKey)

Example 2

Example 3

Important Note 1: charCode, keyCode and which properties is deprecated. So neither my crossBrowser_initKeyboardEvent no KeyboardEvent constructor is absolutely guaranteed right values of that properties in some browsers. You can using properties "key" and "char" instead or edit my gist to force using initEvent in browsers with read-only charCode, keyCode and which properties.

Important Note 2: keypress event is deprecated and for now unsupported in my Keyboard Event Level 3 polyfill. That's mean that key and char properties in keypress event can have random values. I am working to fix that problem to backward compatibility.

share|improve this answer
    
Best description of the problem I've seen so far. +1 –  Oliver Joseph Ash May 29 '13 at 20:04
    
@termi, I have tried to use your source to simulate event on Chrome 36, but does not work !! –  Akash Kava Jul 21 '14 at 17:39
1  
@AkashKava, do you try "cross-browser initKeyboardEvent function (gist)" or polyfill? Polyfill is out-of-date. I don't have much free time to fix it. But "cross-browser initKeyboardEvent function (gist)" is working for me. Can you provide an example? –  termi Jul 22 '14 at 13:00

EDITED: Orwellophile's solution does work. Check out this demo to see it in action + a generic event alternative : http://jsbin.com/awenaq/4

share|improve this answer
    
This works, so I will vote for it (since I can't vote for my own answer). But FTR, I have added a copy of Podium.keydown to your test, which works fine. Unless OS X Chrome has diverged from whatever Chrome everyone else is using? jsbin.com/awenaq/4 –  Orwellophile Sep 24 '12 at 13:53
    
@Orwellophile : nice one. it does work. –  Philip Nuzhnyy Sep 25 '12 at 16:53
    
The fact that we have two semi-distinct solutions to a previously unsolved problem is pretty cool. Although, I must admit, the OP provided the first solution, I just fixed it so I could use it in my own code. :p –  Orwellophile Sep 28 '12 at 5:46

In order to get @Orwellophile's script to work on Google Chrome 26.0.1410.65 (on Mac OS X 10.7.5, if that matters), I had to change one line: his script appears to have the paramaters of initKeyboardEvent in different order than the MDN documentation for initKeyboardEvent.

The changed line looks like this:

oEvent.initKeyboardEvent("keydown", true, true, document.defaultView, k, k, "", "", false, "");
share|improve this answer

All the solutions above are working, but I've found one case they won't.

If Dart is being used, Dart code that uses KeyboardEvents won't work on a general Event.

You'll get something like get$keyCode is undefined.

after banging my head for hours on this, I've found the following trick:

function __triggerKeyboardEvent(el, keyCode)
{
   var eventObj = document.createEventObject ?
       document.createEventObject() : document.createEvent("Events");

   var tempKeyboardObj = document.createEvent("KeyboardEvents");

   if(eventObj.initEvent){
      eventObj.initEvent("keydown", true, true);
   }
   eventObj.___dart_dispatch_record_ZxYxX_0_ = tempKeyboardObj.___dart_dispatch_record_ZxYxX_0_
   eventObj.keyCode = keyCode;
   eventObj.which = keyCode;

   el.dispatchEvent ? el.dispatchEvent(eventObj) : el.fireEvent("onkeydown", eventObj);

} 

Fooling Dart interceptor to thing our Event is actually a KeyboardEvent, did the trick.

Leaving it here, for the poor guy that is trying to test Dart app on a webkit based browser.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.