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Today I tried to use const indentifier, but I find the const variable can still be modified, which confuses me..

Following is the code, in compare(const void *a, const void *b) function, I tried to modify the value that a is pointing to:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int values[] = {40, 10, 100, 90, 20, 25};

int compare (const void *a, const void*b)
{
    *(int*)a=2;
/* Then the value that a points to will be changed! */
    return ( *(int*)a - *(int*)b);
}

int main ()
{
    int n;
    qsort(values, 6, sizeof(int), compare);
    for (n = 0; n < 6; n++)
        printf("%d ", values[n]);
    return 0;
}

Then I also tried to change the value of a itself:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int values[] = {40, 10, 100, 90, 20, 25};

int compare (const void *a, const void*b)
{
    a=b;
    return ( *(int*)a - *(int*)b);
}

int main ()
{
    int n;
    qsort(values, 6, sizeof(int), compare);
    for (n = 0; n < 6; n++)
        printf("%d ", values[n]);
    return 0;
}

However, I found both of them works.. Can anyone explain to me why I need to use const in the parameter list of compare if they can still be changed?

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2  
You casted the const away. Cast to const int* instead. –  Hans Passant May 4 '12 at 21:11
    
Darn C-style casts. –  chris May 4 '12 at 21:11
    
to quote myself: (im)mutability is an inherent property of the object itself, regardless of the qualification of the pointer used to access it - as values isn't const-qualified, modifying it is perfectly legal... –  Christoph May 4 '12 at 21:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Case 1: You are using a static cast to cast away the constness. You are violating the contract that was defined for the method.

Case 2: You are not changing the contents of a (which is const), but assigning the variable a which contains a const void pointer.

For practical implications: With case 1.) you could shoot yourself in the foot, in case a was not really pointing to a variable.

Suggestion: Cast away constness only if you know what you are doing.

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there is no such contract in case 1, or at least no contract enforced by language semantics (ie the compiler can't optimize calling code on the assumption that const-qualified arguments won't be modified - even if restrict is present); it's 'just' a convention... –  Christoph May 4 '12 at 21:33
2  
The contract is not for the compiler, but for the poor guy who called the function in case 1 and expected to have his first parameter unchanged afterwards. –  Christopher Oezbek May 4 '12 at 21:55

It only works in this case because the pointer you're working against wasn't originally constant. Casting away constness and then modifying a value is undefined behaviour. UB means that the app can do anything from succeed to crash to make purple dragons fly out of your nostrils.

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There were purple dragons in the last UB story... :( –  user166390 May 4 '12 at 21:12
4  
It's only UB if the underlying objects are const. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 4 '12 at 21:14
    
Technically correct (the best kind of correct), but he's still casting away constness, which is a code smell at best and a world-ending nuclear-missile-launching day-ruiner at worst. –  Jonathan Grynspan May 4 '12 at 22:20

Its protecting you from silly mistakes, not when you try hard to make a mistake.
(int *)a when a is const something * is a bad practice, use (const int *)a instead.
a = b when a is const void * is ok because only the value pointed to is const. if you want both *a = x and a = x disallowed, declare a as const void * const.

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Actually.

int compare (const void *a, const void*b);

Here there are 2 things you need to consider, the pointer and the memory location that the pointer is pointing to. The pointer is not constant but the memory location is.

If you would change the signature to:

int compare (const void *const a, const void *const void);

Then everything would be const. In your case you can change the pointer but not the value. So that your pointer can point to a different memory location.

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