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Is there a way to read a ByteBuffer with a BufferedReader without having to turn it into a String first? I want to read through a fairly large ByteBuffer as lines of text and for performance reasons I want to avoid writing it to the disk. Calling toString on the ByteBuffer doesn't work because the resulting String is too large (it throws java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space). I would have thought there would be something in the API to wrap a ByteBuffer in a suitable reader, but I can't seem to find anything suitable.

Here's an abbreviated code sample the illustrates what I am doing):

// input stream is from Process getInputStream()
public String read(InputStream istream)
{
  ReadableByteChannel source = Channels.newChannel(istream);
  ByteArrayOutputStream ostream = new ByteArrayOutputStream(bufferSize);
  WritableByteChannel destination = Channels.newChannel(ostream);
  ByteBuffer buffer = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(writeBufferSize);

  while (source.read(buffer) != -1)
  {
    buffer.flip();
    while (buffer.hasRemaining())
    {
      destination.write(buffer);
    }
    buffer.clear();
  }

  // this data can be up to 150 MB.. won't fit in a String.
  result = ostream.toString();
  source.close();
  destination.close();
  return result;
}

// after the process is run, we call this method with the String
public void readLines(String text)
{
  BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new StringReader(text));
  String line;

  while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null)
  {
    // do stuff with line
  }
}
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's not clear why you're using a byte buffer to start with. If you've got an InputStream and you want to read lines for it, why don't you just use an InputStreamReader wrapped in a BufferedReader? What's the benefit in getting NIO involved?

Calling toString() on a ByteArrayOutputStream sounds like a bad idea to me even if you had the space for it: better to get it as a byte array and wrap it in a ByteArrayInputStream and then an InputStreamReader, if you really have to have a ByteArrayOutputStream. If you really want to call toString(), at least use the overload which takes the name of the character encoding to use - otherwise it'll use the system default, which probably isn't what you want.

EDIT: Okay, so you really want to use NIO. You're still writing to a ByteArrayOutputStream eventually, so you'll end up with a BAOS with the data in it. If you want to avoid making a copy of that data, you'll need to derive from ByteArrayOutputStream, for instance like this:

public class ReadableByteArrayOutputStream extends ByteArrayOutputStream
{
    /**
     * Converts the data in the current stream into a ByteArrayInputStream.
     * The resulting stream wraps the existing byte array directly;
     * further writes to this output stream will result in unpredictable
     * behavior.
     */
    public InputStream toInputStream()
    {
        return new ByteArrayInputStream(array, 0, count);
    }
}

Then you can create the input stream, wrap it in an InputStreamReader, wrap that in a BufferedReader, and you're away.

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Good question - I would agree and that's what I would do if I had the option. The reason I can't in this case is that I can't do anything with the output from the process (i.e. the InputStream) until the process is finished, so I need to put it in a buffer to read later. –  Rob Jun 25 '09 at 19:19
2  
So put it into a byte array with ByteArrayOutputStream. Once you've got it as a byte array, you're fine. That's effectively what NIO is going to be doing anyway, it's just more straightforward with BAOS. If it's going to be enormous, you might want to derive your own ByteArrayOutputStream which gives you direct access to the byte array, so you don't need to worry about creating a copy with toByteArray(). It's a shame ByteArrayOutputStream doesn't have a "toByteArrayInputStream" to let you read directly from it... –  Jon Skeet Jun 25 '09 at 19:24
1  
As for why I'm using NIO: partly because I'm a masochist and am determined to get NIO figured out once and for all (if that is, in fact, humanly possible), and partly because I want be read the InputStream as fast as possible and NIO seems quicker for this sort of thing. –  Rob Jun 25 '09 at 19:25
    
Okay, if you really, really want to use NIO - editing answer. –  Jon Skeet Jun 25 '09 at 19:49
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You can use NIO, but there's no real need here. As Jon Skeet suggested:

public byte[] read(InputStream istream)
{
  ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
  byte[] buffer = new byte[1024]; // Experiment with this value
  int bytesRead;

  while ((bytesRead = istream.read(buffer)) != -1)
  {
    baos.write(buffer, 0, bytesRead);
  }

  return baos.toByteArray();
}


// after the process is run, we call this method with the String
public void readLines(byte[] data)
{
  BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(new ByteArrayInputStream(data)));
  String line;

  while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null)
  {
    // do stuff with line
  }
}
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1  
Although this is not the answer I accepted (since I wanted to try using NIO), this using standard IO like this turned out to be faster than the NIO approach. Still, it was a good learning experience to try NIO. –  Rob Jun 25 '09 at 23:06
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This is a sample:

public class ByteBufferBackedInputStream extends InputStream {

    ByteBuffer buf;

    public ByteBufferBackedInputStream(ByteBuffer buf) {
        this.buf = buf;
    }

    public synchronized int read() throws IOException {
        if (!buf.hasRemaining()) {
            return -1;
        }
        return buf.get() & 0xFF;
    }

    @Override
    public int available() throws IOException {
        return buf.remaining();
    }

    public synchronized int read(byte[] bytes, int off, int len) throws IOException {
        if (!buf.hasRemaining()) {
            return -1;
        }

        len = Math.min(len, buf.remaining());
        buf.get(bytes, off, len);
        return len;
    }
}

And you can use it like this:

    String text = "this is text";   // It can be Unicode text
    ByteBuffer buffer = ByteBuffer.wrap(text.getBytes("UTF-8"));

    InputStream is = new ByteBufferBackedInputStream(buffer);
    InputStreamReader r = new InputStreamReader(is, "UTF-8");
    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(r);
    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(r);
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