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I have a bamboo build that needs to access a small part of a large git repository. In order to save time and disk space, I would like to check out only the part of the repository that is relevant for the build. I already know about shallow checkouts. I want to do more than that and restrict the checkout to just a single folder (and its descendants).

I see this option and I think this is what I have to use, but I haven't been able to get it working: enter image description here

How can I do the minimal checkout that I want?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Easiest is probably to have whoever's hosting the repo tag and commit the particular tree you want. For instance,

On upstream:

git tag quickie $(git commit-tree $(git rev-parse HEAD:path/to/dir) </dev/null)

you:

git fetch upstream quickie

If you want the upstream repo to automatically track a subtree on a branch, you can do (a suitably decrypted version of) something like this:

sed -n 's,^[^ ]* [^ ]* refs/heads/master$,git update-ref refs/heads/master-subtree -m "Auto-tracking master" $(git commit-tree master:subtree -m "Auto-tracking master subtree" $(test -r refs/heads/master-subtree \&\& echo -p refs/heads/master-subtree)),p' | sh -x

which is simpler than it looks. Try this:

mkdir ~/tryitout && cd ~/tryitout && git init foo && git init bar --bare
cat >bar/hooks/post-receive <<'EOF'
sed -n 's,^[^ ]* [^ ]* refs/heads/master$,git update-ref refs/heads/master-subtree -m "Auto-tracking master" $(git commit-tree master:subtree -m "Auto-tracking master subtree" $(test -r refs/heads/master-subtree \&\& echo -p refs/heads/master-subtree)),p' | sh -x
EOF
chmod a+x bar/hooks/post-receive
cd foo
mkdir subtree && touch subtree/oooo && git add . && git commit -am-
git push ../bar master

Late Update --

If you're sharing a filesystem with the other repo, you can do this:

git clone --no-checkout /path/to/local/repo/.git subtree
cd subtree
git commit-tree origin/rev:subtree </dev/null | xargs git checkout -B peek

and you can bounce around at will by changing the rev to suit, origin/master:include, origin/next:include, origin/v1.4:somewhereelsenow, whatever.

I generally have an "empty" branch for large repos. Git does handle one special case of an empty directory:

git mktree </dev/null | xargs git commit-tree | xargs git checkout -b empty
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1  
p.s. HEAD can of course be any rev you want – jthill May 4 '12 at 23:35
    
But, then wouldn't the tag need to be maintained? I.e, if a relevant part of the repo changes, then we'd need to cherry-pick that change into the tag. Or am I misunderstanding? – Andrew Eisenberg May 5 '12 at 2:05
    
@AndrewEisenberg You do need a ref for anything you're going to fetch. I'll add a line to show how to make an upstream auto-track a subtree – jthill May 5 '12 at 20:42
    
Thanks for the detailed solution. I tried it out and it seems to work. I would have just needed to remember to push every time a relevant change occurs in the subtree. I'll mark your question as accepted, but I found a different solution to my problem. Since the repository is already being checked out by a second build, the first build simply uses the checked-out content from the second build using fully qualified path names. I'm not entirely happy about using full path names, but it is the simplest way to go and least prone to breaking over time. – Andrew Eisenberg May 5 '12 at 22:26
    
Okay, I didn't see that your other repo was local. Here's what you do: – jthill May 13 '12 at 3:40

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