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I have a program that needs two integers to be entered to set up a 2d array and if you enter a letter then the program does not work.

Is there any way to check if it is a number that has been entered or to limit what is pressed on the key board to only numbers?

Once the number has been entered it is scanned into a variable to set up the array.

Here is the example of code:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>

int x;
int y;

int main(void){

    int array[x][y];
    int i;
    int j;
    srand(time(NULL));


printf("Please Enter Size X Of Array:");
scanf("%d",&x);
printf("\n");
printf("please Enter Size Y Of Array:");
scanf("%d",&y);


    printf("\n Randomised Numbers Table \n\n");

    for (i = 0; i < x; i++){

        for (j = 0; j < y; j++){
            array[i][j] =(rand()%10000);
            printf("%d \t", array[i][j]);
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not sure what to put to limit what is pressed when it asks you to input a value into the program. –  user1376036 May 4 '12 at 22:52
    
i put the code into the question. basically when it asks for you to enter size x of array and you would normally type 5 i want it to check that it is a number that has been entered not any letter from the keyboard –  user1376036 May 4 '12 at 23:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The best way to deal with this is to loop until you have valid input. With bash, you can use the regular expression operator to make sure the string is valid before proceeding.

# Loop until your input is valid.
unset REPLY
until [[ $REPLY =~ ^[0-9]{2}$ ]]; do
    read -p 'Digit: '
done
echo "You entered: $REPLY"
share|improve this answer
    
ok ill try this now thanks for the quick reply –  user1376036 May 4 '12 at 23:09
    
Heh, this is why it is worth waiting for the questioner to provide details... –  sarnold May 4 '12 at 23:09
    
do you have to declare any variables for this to work or what, sorry for my ignorance I'm new to c and have to do this for a project in university –  user1376036 May 4 '12 at 23:14
    
This isn't C, this is bash; CodeGnome answered before you mentioned what language you were working in... (though the idea of looping until you have valid input is perfectly correct..) –  sarnold May 5 '12 at 0:00
    
ok thanks guys, the lecturer says this is C so thought it was. I'm not arguing with you just not sure on all the different languages. Thanks for the quick reply. –  user1376036 May 5 '12 at 0:23

Here's a C example of doing single-character, non-echoed tty I/O on various *ix's. It knows how to do it in 3 different ways, via ifdef's.

http://stromberg.dnsalias.org/~strombrg/ttype/

You could probably just use termios today.

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Simplest way: Use select:

select a in {20..40}
do
  select b in {5..10} 
  do  
    echo $((a*10+b))
  done
done

invalid input is rejected automatically. Use Ctrl+D to terminate.

I should note that select is a bash buildin.

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I know this is an old question, I know it is a homework assignment, and I know that the OP will not come back and accept my answer, but this question inspired me to write the following program, and it is the correct answer to this question.

#include <termios.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int getdigit() {
    int total = 0;
    struct termios oldtc, newtc;
    int ch;
    tcgetattr(STDIN_FILENO, &oldtc);
    newtc = oldtc;
    newtc.c_lflag &= ~(ICANON | ECHO);
    tcsetattr(STDIN_FILENO, TCSANOW, &newtc);
    while (1) {
        ch=getchar();
        if (ch == 127) { // Backspace
            total /= 10;
            printf("\b \b");
            continue;
        } else if (ch == 10) { // Return
            putchar(ch);
            break;
        } else if (ch < '0' || ch > '9') {
            continue;
        }
        putchar(ch);
        total *= 10;
        total += ch-'0';
    }
    tcsetattr(STDIN_FILENO, TCSANOW, &oldtc);
    return total;
}

int main() {
    int n;
    printf("Enter a number: ");
    n = getdigit();
    printf("You entered: %d\n", n);
    return 0;
}

Here you go, a C program that only accepts digits as input. It will ignore all letters; They will not even show up in the terminal.

There are a few problems though. It doesn't handle integer overflow; Enter too many digits and it will not return the right value. You could solve this by adding a counter and not allow more than x characters. A counter would also be good to stop the user from erasing the whole line with backspace. If I implement a counter I may come back and post an update.

I've only tested the program on Mac OS X Lion, but I assume it will work on most Unix compatible systems. No warranty expressed or implied.


EDIT: Here's a version with that counter implemented.

#include <termios.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int getdigits(int limit) {
    if (limit > 9 || limit < 1) limit = 9;
    int count = 0;
    int total = 0;
    struct termios oldtc, newtc;
    int ch;
    tcgetattr(STDIN_FILENO, &oldtc);
    newtc = oldtc;
    newtc.c_lflag &= ~(ICANON | ECHO);
    tcsetattr(STDIN_FILENO, TCSANOW, &newtc);
    while (1) {
        ch=getchar();
        if (ch == 127) { // Backspace
            if (count > 0) {
                total /= 10;
                count--;
                printf("\b \b");
            } else {
                putchar('\a');
            }
        } else if (ch == 10) { // Return
            putchar(ch);
            break;
        } else if (ch < '0' || ch > '9') {
            putchar('\a');
        } else {
            if (count < limit) {
                putchar(ch);
                total *= 10;
                total += ch-'0';
                count++;
            } else {
                putchar('\a');
            }
        }
    }
    tcsetattr(STDIN_FILENO, TCSANOW, &oldtc);
    return total;
}


int main() {
    int n;
    printf("Enter a number: ");
    n = getdigits(0);
    printf("You entered: %d\n", n);
    return 0;
}

The maximum (and default) limit is 9 digits. If you want a higher limit you could implement a 64 bit version of the method. I didn't bother, because the OP would be using this code to set the size of a two dimensional integer array. 999,999,999*999,999,999*4 bytes (assuming 32 bit integers) equals roughly 4 exabytes and I think it will be a while until we have computers with that much memory. If you do have a computer with that much memory I will happily make a 64 bit version for you.* (Not that I have any clue what you would do with such an array.)

Another thing I added is a beep whenever the user enters invalid input. Thought it might be nice to give the user some feedback when we're not accepting his input.

* Of course I understand that you may want to use the input for something else than creating gigantic multidimensional arrays and in that case I will also be happy to write a 64 bit version for you.

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