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So, I have what I believe is some really simple php/html code. I just do not understand how the _construct() method isn't executing before the HTML form. Can someone please give me an explanation.

Code from my page:

<?php   class register {
        function __construct() {
            echo 'SYSTEM: This is the register page';
        }
    }

?>
    <form action="http://abc.org/test" method="POST">
    <input type="username" value="">
    <input type="password" value="">
    <input type="submit" value="Register">
    </form>

How it looks:

How it looks

EDIT Sorry for not including this in the original post, but I'm creating the class from another page.

Page abc.com/a has this code:

<?php require './'.'register'.'.php'; 
                $obj = new register; ?>

The code at the top of this question is from register.php

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Obviously you're creating the class after you echo the form... –  animuson May 4 '12 at 23:08
    
you need to make an instance of the class i.e. an object for it to do anything. so try to add a $register = new register(); –  Onheiron May 4 '12 at 23:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The class code will run after the form, because after your require line the form has already been output. Only then you instance the class, whose constructor echoes the message.

If you want to echo before the form, just instance the class right after you define it:

<?php   
class register {
    function __construct() {
        echo 'SYSTEM: This is the register page';
    }
}
$register = new register();
?>
<form action="http://abc.org/test" method="POST">
    <input type="username" value="">
    <input type="password" value="">
    <input type="submit" value="Register">
</form>
share|improve this answer
    
If I don't require then my page get's an error. What should I do about that? Sorry, I'm still pretty new to php. The error is: Fatal error: Class 'register' not found in /public_html/index.php on line 11 –  EGHDK May 4 '12 at 23:17
    
See my update. The thing is, the $register = new register(); is what gets the class started, the class declaration just states what the class is, without running any of its internal code. –  bfavaretto May 4 '12 at 23:20
    
By the way: on the other page, you need the require, but you don't need $obj = new register;. That goes to register.php. One more thing: you don't need all that string concatenation for the require, use just require './register.php'; –  bfavaretto May 4 '12 at 23:26
    
Ah, yes that worked. Thank you for your explanation.I didn't know that requiring the file automatically showed the content html content on that page. Last thing, should I use require or include? –  EGHDK May 4 '12 at 23:27
    
From the manual: "require is identical to include except upon failure it will also produce a fatal E_COMPILE_ERROR level error. In other words, it will halt the script whereas include only emits a warning (E_WARNING) which allows the script to continue." –  bfavaretto May 5 '12 at 18:09

You are defining a class, but I don't see where you instantiate an object of that class type. There must be more code after what you've pasted here that does the instantiating, and hence you see the echo() call

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Updated my question –  EGHDK May 4 '12 at 23:14

I agree with bfavaretto, his code snippet will work for sure. I generally like to keep my classes, functions, and output in separate files so that it has a little more cross project usability as follows. Might be a little more php coding, but in the end, the reusability has helped me a lot. I would organize your project as follows.

Original page being loaded:

<?php require './includes/class/register.class.php'; ?>
<?php include './includes/registerModules.php'; ?>

$register = new register();  //Calls the constructor for class 'register'

<?php registerForm(); ?> // Runs the registerForm() function.  Nothing is output to the browser until this function is called.  That way you can include a test to see if a user is already logged in and use a header redirect (which requires that no output code be sent to the browser before the header function is called) if you so desire.

./includes/class/register.class.php

class register {
    function __construct() {
        echo 'SYSTEM: This is the register page';
    }
}

./includes/registerModules.php

function registerForm(){
    echo '<form action="http://abc.org/test" method="POST">
    <input type="username" value="">
    <input type="password" value="">
    <input type="submit" value="Register">
    </form>';
}

This way any time you may need any of the classes that you may add to register.class.php, you can include them on pages that may not necessarily require the registration form to be displayed. Such as any post-processing you may need to do. The classes will all be there, and you can just instantiate them with the proper constructor (in this case $register = new register();).

Since you included the functions in registerModules.php, anywhere you call the desired function the function's output will appear in the location the function call was made. Makes for easier formatting. For instance the form won't show until you call <?php registerForm(); ?>. That way you can reuse the form after creating any constructors you may need as shown above, and display the form with common formatting in other areas of your site.

I know in this case the register form will likely only appear once, but this is reusable formatting and you can apply it to any common element.

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Thanks for that. Will definitely look into using your methods for larger projects. I really appreciate it. –  EGHDK May 4 '12 at 23:57
    
And I agree with you! –  bfavaretto May 5 '12 at 18:10

To get the constructor called, you need to instantiate the class first, for example:

$register = new register();

That will call it's constructor. What you do is just defining the class, but it does not come to live automatically. Same for functions, they need to be called as well.

See new and Constructors and Destructors.

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