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(note: not the same as this other question since the OP never explicitly specified rounding towards 0 or -Infinity)

JLS 15.17.2 says that integer division rounds towards zero. If I want floor()-like behavior for positive divisors (I don't care about the behavior for negative divisors), what's the simplest way to achieve this that is numerically correct for all inputs?

int ifloor(int n, int d)
{
    /* returns q such that n = d*q + r where 0 <= r < d
     * for all integer n, d where d > 0
     *
     * d = 0 should have the same behavior as `n/d`
     *
     * nice-to-have behaviors for d < 0:
     *   option (a). same as above: 
     *     returns q such that n = d*q + r where 0 <= r < -d
     *   option (b). rounds towards +infinity:
     *     returns q such that n = d*q + r where d < r <= 0
     */
}

long lfloor(long n, long d)
{
    /* same behavior as ifloor, except for long integers */
}

(update: I want to have a solution both for int and long arithmetic.)

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this has to be a duplicate, but I can't find it, and if it's not a duplicate then I'm just totally surprised it hasn't come up yet after 3+ years of StackOverflow. –  Jason S May 4 '12 at 23:09
    
In the d < 0 conditions for the remainder, I think you've got a couple of inverted signs. It looks like you want 0 <= r < -d for option (a) and d < r <= 0 for option (b). –  Mark Dickinson May 6 '12 at 9:59
    
right: thank you, I did mean the positive version of the divisor. (and it should have been rounding towards +infinity) –  Jason S May 6 '12 at 13:00

4 Answers 4

return BigDecimal.valueOf(n).divide(BigDecimal.valueOf(d), RoundingMode.FLOOR).longValue();
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(I'm doing everything for longs since the answer for ints is the same, just substitute int for every long and Integer for every Long.)

You could just Math.floor a double division result, otherwise...

Original answer:

return n/d - ( ( n % d != 0 ) && ( (n<0) ^ (d<0) ) ? 1 : 0 );

Optimized answer:

public static long lfloordiv( long n, long d ) {

    long q = n/d;
    if( q*d == n ) return q;
    return q - ((n^d) >>> (Long.SIZE-1));
}

(For completeness, using a BigDecimal with a ROUND_FLOOR rounding mode is also an option.)

New edit: Now I'm just trying to see how far it can be optimized for fun. Using Mark's answer the best I have so far is:

public static long lfloordiv2( long n, long d ){

    if( d >= 0 ){
        n = -n;
        d = -d;
    }
    long tweak = (n >>> (Long.SIZE-1) ) - 1;
    return (n + tweak) / d + tweak;
}

(Uses cheaper operations than the above, but slightly longer bytecode (29 vs. 26)).

share|improve this answer
    
Please don't refer me towards Math.floor. If it happens to work properly for int variables (which I'm not certain of), it won't work for long variables because of lack of precision. –  Jason S May 4 '12 at 23:13
    
I'm heading out the door in a minute but if I can spot-check it on Monday for correctness, I'll +1. Thanks + have a good weekend.... –  Jason S May 4 '12 at 23:21
2  
Nice! A trivial obfuscating optimization: replace (n<0) ^ (d<0) with n^d < 0 . The compiler might do this optimization for you, but I doubt it. –  Ed Staub May 5 '12 at 0:24
    
Ed: Watch out: n*d may yield improper results on overflow. –  Jason S May 5 '12 at 0:54
    
@JasonS that's an XOR (^) not *. –  trutheality May 5 '12 at 0:56

There's a rather neat formula for this that works when n < 0 and d > 0: take the bitwise complement of n, do the division, and then take the bitwise complement of the result.

int ifloordiv(int n, int d)
{
    if (n >= 0)
        return n / d;
    else
        return ~(~n / d);
}

For the remainder, a similar construction works (compatible with ifloordiv in the sense that the usual invariant ifloordiv(n, d) * d + ifloormod(n, d) == n is satisfied) giving a result that's always in the range [0, d).

int ifloormod(int n, int d)
{
    if (n >= 0)
        return n % d;
    else
        return d + ~(~n % d);
}

For negative divisors, the formulas aren't quite so neat. Here are expanded versions of ifloordiv and ifloormod that follow your 'nice-to-have' behavior option (b) for negative divisors.

int ifloordiv(int n, int d)
{
    if (d >= 0)
        return n >= 0 ? n / d : ~(~n / d);
    else
        return n <= 0 ? n / d : (n - 1) / d - 1;
}

int ifloormod(int n, int d)
{
    if (d >= 0)
        return n >= 0 ? n % d : d + ~(~n % d);
    else
        return n <= 0 ? n % d : d + 1 + (n - 1) % d;
}

For d < 0, there's an unavoidable problem case when d == -1 and n is Integer.MIN_VALUE, since then the mathematical result overflows the type. In that case, the formula above returns the wrapped result, just as the usual Java division does. As far as I'm aware, this is the only corner case where we silently get 'wrong' results.

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@trutheality: Gah, I'm an idiot! Thanks; will fix this immediately! –  Mark Dickinson May 7 '12 at 10:36
    
@trutheality: True, except that the result still comes out as MIN_VALUE, which is mathematically wrong (but correct modulo 2**<whatever>, so maybe that's good enough). I have a nasty feeling that there are other corner cases lurking for d < 0, but didn't take the time to figure out what they all are. Maybe I should do that. –  Mark Dickinson May 7 '12 at 17:21
    
Huh, turns out I wasn't aware that division can actually overflow. –  trutheality May 7 '12 at 17:40
    
@trutheality: I edited the last paragraph; any better? As far as I can tell, that case really is the only corner case. –  Mark Dickinson May 7 '12 at 18:01
    
Yes, that's perfectly clear now. –  trutheality May 7 '12 at 18:32

If you can use third-party libraries, Guava has this: IntMath.divide(int, int, RoundingMode.FLOOR) and LongMath.divide(int, int, RoundingMode.FLOOR). (Disclosure: I contribute to Guava.)

If you don't want to use a third-party library for this, you can still look at the implementation.

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that's good to hear -- guava is a very reputable library. –  Jason S May 5 '12 at 0:28

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