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I see a lot of questions similar to this one but they are answered with code that I haven't learned yet. I am supposed to be able to do this task without an arraylist so that is providing a challenge for me. I need to play a game of war: create a card class, create a deck and then randomly generate the first card, "remove" the card from the deck and produce a 2nd card in order to see which card won, continue this comparison until the deck is exhausted. Here is what I have so far:

public class Card
{
private int cardValue; 
private String cardSuit;
private String stringValue;
static final String[] SUIT = {"Clubs", "Diamonds", "Hearts", "Spades"}; 
static final String[] VALUE =  {"Ace","Two", "Three", "Four", "Five", "Six", "Seven", "Eight", "Nine", "Ten", "Jack", "Queen", "King"}; 


/**
*CONSTRUCTOR for Card class
*contains the arrays for both suit and values
**/
public Card (int cardS, int cardV)
{

    cardSuit = SUIT[cardS]; 
    stringValue = VALUE[cardV];
}

/**
*Get method for card suit, access the value of cardSuit
**/
public String getCardSuit()
{
        return cardSuit;
}

/**
*get method for card's VALUES
**/
public String getValue()
{
    return stringValue;
}
//in order to display string value of cards
public String toString() 
{ 
    return String.format("%s of %s", stringValue, cardSuit); 
} 

}

public class Deck
    {
    private final int HIGH_SUIT=3;
    private final int HIGH_VALUE=12;

    int i = 0; 
    int cardCount;              

    Card[] fullDeck = new Card[52]; 
    public Deck()
    {

        for(int s = 0; s <= HIGH_SUIT; s++)
        {
            //for loop to determine the suit
            for (int v = 0; v <= HIGH_VALUE; v++)
            {
                //construct all 52 cards and print them out 
                fullDeck[i] = new Card(s, v);
                cardCount = (i + 1);
                i++;//increment the card counter

            }
        }   
    }

}

public class War3

{
public static void main(String[] args)
{
    int i=0;
    Deck[] fullDeck = new Deck[52]; //set up the deck
    //create a random value for the first card
    int r = ((int) (Math.random() * 100) % 51);//create random number

    Card[] playerCard = new Card[r];//create the player's card

    System.out.println("The card is: " + playerCard.toString());


    }

As you can see, I didn't get very far with War 3 because I don't know how to display the first card. When run it displays this:The card is: [LCard;@4a5ab2random#1 How do I display the first card in the array? I need help figuring out how to assign the first card and the 2nd card, display them both then compare them. I've got a long way to go so one step at a time.

share|improve this question
1  
The problem is that you're trying to print the playerCard object. By default, is using the Object.toString() implementation, so you should override that method in your Card class. –  Luiggi Mendoza May 5 '12 at 0:12
    
What exactly is "a game of war"? I would suggest to let the deck deal with drawing the first card. –  Behe May 5 '12 at 0:21
    
You are initiating an array of cards instead of only one card. Replace the square brackets with normal ones to get a constructor call and remove them from the type spec like this: Card playerCard = new Card(r). –  s1lence May 5 '12 at 0:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The easiest thing to do would be to implement a toString method in your Card class.

public String toString() {
    return String.format("%s of %s", stringValue, cardSuit);
}

While you are at it, move the two arrays (suit and value) out of the constructor, make them static final, and rename to all-upper case:

static final String[] SUIT = {"Clubs", "Diamonds", "Hearts", "Spades"};
static final String[] VALUE = {"Ace","Two", "Three", "Four", "Five", "Six", "Seven",
                "Eight", "Nine", "Ten", "Jack", "Queen", "King"};

Also the selection of the card should not be done like you do:

Card[] playerCard = new Card[r];//create the player's card

creates an array of r cards, and assigns it to playerCard. This is incorrect: you have already created all your cards in the Deck, it's a matter of taking a random one from it:

public Card takeRandomCard() {
    int r;
    do {
        r = (int)(Math.random() * 52);
    } while (taken[r]);
    taken[r] = true;
    return fullDeck[r];
}

Note the little addition here: taken is an array of 52 boolean objects indicating that the card has been taken from the deck.

Here is your code with my modifications from above working at ideone.

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3  
Or make SUIT and VALUE enumerations. –  Hassan May 5 '12 at 0:15
1  
@Hassan I'm not sure it that's a prudent advice: considering that they did not study ArrayLists, I think the chances that they have learned enums are somewhat slim. –  dasblinkenlight May 5 '12 at 0:17
    
You're probably right. –  Hassan May 5 '12 at 0:23
    
It's difficult to give a simplified solution because we can't tell how much @t220 knows. In addition to dasblinkenlight's answer, look into Comparable –  user845279 May 5 '12 at 0:33
    
Thanks for that tip. I changed it but still getting the same result –  t220 May 5 '12 at 0:36

Card.cardSuit and Card.stringValue are both strings for each Card object. Although you are not initializing the Cards.

You are also creating an array of 52 decks. This is unnecessary.

Deck[] fullDeck = new Deck[52];

should be

Deck fullDeck = new Deck();

you only need one deck, as the constructor for the array creates 52 card objects for you. You then want to randomly access each of these cards and display them. Thus when you have your random number r, you want to grab that number card from the Deck object:

fullDeck.fullDeck[r]

will retrieve a random card from your deck. To display the string values in this card:

System.out.println("The card is: " + fullDeck.fullDeck[r].getCardSuit() + fullDeck.fullDeck[r].getValue() + "random#" + r);

also declaring new outside of a constructor is bad form.

share|improve this answer
    
This was helpful too. Thanks. –  t220 May 11 '12 at 11:44

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