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This is quite an interesting issue I'm having with z-indexes that I've never encountered before. Let me go ahead and answer one of your first thoughts you might be having: I've already set the positioning I need for each element I have a z-index on, it's not that. I've tried reordering things as much as possible, but basically what I have is two fixed elements, one is the website's heading text, the next is a div containing an unordered list of navigation items (each floated left and given a percentage width).

Here's the location of the problem (make sure you're viewing at a width larger than 1000px).

For the life of me, I've not been able to pinpoint why exactly the first two navigation items ("Home" and "About") actually don't mouseover entirely. It seems as though their mouseover functionality is cut off by the descender in the heading above it.

I would create a jsFiddle of the issue, and in fact I did to try and point out my problem, but I am using a custom font for this, which to my knowledge wouldn't work in jsFiddle. Keep in mind, the issue is cross-browser, not IE-specific. Sorry I'm not much help otherwise, but I guess Firebug is your friend.

I will post this HTML/CSS code however, seeing as it might be easier than viewing in Firebug...

HTML:

<div id="header">
    <h1 id="logo"><a href="#">Page Title</a></h1>
    <h2 id="tagline"><a href="#">Here's a tagline</a></h2>
    <div id="nav">
        <ul>
            <li><a href="#">Home</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">About</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">Portfolio</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">Resume</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">Blog</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">Contact</a></li>
        </ul>
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

#logo, #tagline { font-weight: normal; font-family: 'Pacifico', cursive; font-size: 60px; display: inline; margin-right: 20px; position: relative; z-index: 4; }
#logo a, #tagline a { color: #FFF; text-shadow: 2px 2px 0px #f7be82; -webkit-text-shadow: 2px 2px 0px #f7be82; -moz-text-shadow: 2px 2px 0px #f7be82; -o-text-shadow: 2px 2px 0px #f7be82; }
#logo a:hover, #tagline a:hover { color: #FFF; }
#tagline { font-size: 18px; }
#tagline a { text-shadow: 1px 1px 0px #f7be82; -webkit-text-shadow: 1px 1px 0px #f7be82; -moz-text-shadow: 1px 1px 0px #f7be82; -o-text-shadow: 1px 1px 0px #f7be82; }

.pageTitle { text-align: center; font-size: 48px; }

#header {
    position: fixed;
    z-index: 3;
    width: 960px;
    background: #9cddc8;
}

#nav {
    position: fixed;
    z-index: 2;
    width: 100%;
    height: 50px;
    top: 81px;
    left: 0px;
    background: #f7be82;
    border-bottom: 2px solid #efb87e;
}

#nav ul { width: 900px; display: block; margin: 0 auto; overflow: hidden; }

#nav ul li {
    position: relative;
    z-index: 5;
    float: left;
    line-height: 50px;
    width: 16.66%;
    line-height: 45px;
    text-align: center;
}

#nav ul li a {
    font-family: 'Pacifico', cursive;
    font-size: 24px;
    color: #FFF;
    text-shadow: 1px 1px 0px #9cddc8; -webkit-text-shadow: 1px 1px 0px #9cddc8; -moz-text-shadow: 1px 1px 0px #9cddc8; -o-text-shadow: 1px 1px 0px #9cddc8;
}

I appreciate any help on the issue, thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Since #nav is inside #header, I'm a little confused as to why you even need a position: fixed on the nav, since it will be fixed by being in the header. –  ScottS May 5 '12 at 1:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The first two items are being cut-off because #logo has a z-index of 4 and #nav has a z-index of 2. Therefore, #logo will be above #nav.

It does not matter that the li descendants within #nav have a z-index of 5 as these elements are in a different stack context than #logo.

You will need to rethink the way you've set up your backgrounds since you need your logo above the orange bar, yet you need the logo under your nav elements.

share|improve this answer
1  
Even though this wasn't the answer that got me the correct code, I learned from it via your link about stack context. To me, learning why something happens is at the end of the day more important that getting the right code. Thank you Jared. –  cereallarceny May 5 '12 at 2:22
    
Thanks, I didn't know about stack context. –  Gastón Sánchez May 28 '13 at 19:59

You don't need the z-index on #nav. Apply position: relative and z-index: 10 (arbitrary, any index > 4 will work) to the ul in #nav.

#nav {
    position: fixed;
    width: 100%;
    height: 50px;
    top: 81px;
    left: 0px;
    background: #F7BE82;
    border-bottom: 2px solid #EFB87E;
}

#nav ul {
    width: 900px;
    display: block;
    margin: 0 auto;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: relative;
    z-index: 10;
}

This will keep your logo above the orange stripe and place your menu items "over" your logo, thereby allowing the hover to work properly.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, I thought that this would not work, because it is the #nav that is in the same stacking context level as the #logo, so the z-index of any elements in #nav should be irrelevant because of the fact that #logo is sitting above #nav. However, I actually tried your solution and it worked (at least on FF). I'm a bit confused as to why. –  ScottS May 5 '12 at 2:18
    
Chrisn, this code was exactly what I was looking for. I am up-voting this answer because it gave me the right answer, but after looking at Jared's response, I actually learned more about the topic of z-indexes. I marked his right because of that. Nonetheless, you were a huge help, thank you! –  cereallarceny May 5 '12 at 2:23
    
I see now. I was under the mistaken assumption that simply adding a position made a new stacking context, but in reading some articles on it learned that a z-index other than auto on that positioned element creates the new stacking context. That explains why your solution worked. Very nice (and I had my misconception corrected). –  ScottS May 5 '12 at 2:53
    
@ScottS actually, I learned something here as well -- I questioned my answer when you first commented. Your explanation is correct, removing the z-index from #nav puts it in the natural stacking order, and then applying position: relative with a z-index > 4 creates a new stacking context there. Although what I've proposed is an acceptable solution, in hindsight, I would not recommend this (save yourself the headache). However, I think this serves as a useful example to others. –  chrisn May 5 '12 at 3:25
#logo, #tagline { font-weight: normal; font-family: 'Pacifico', cursive; font-size: 60px; display: inline; margin-right: 20px; position: relative; <h1>z-index: 4</h1>; }

....
....
....


#nav {
    position: fixed;
    z-index: 2;
    width: 100%;
    height: 50px;
    top: 81px;
    left: 0px;
    background: #f7be82;
    border-bottom: 2px solid #efb87e;
}

...
...
...

you make the z-index of the logo is 4 then the nav one is 2, taht means that the logo will located ABOVE the nav, just change the nav's z-index to 4 and the logo's z-index to 2

hope this helps

share|improve this answer
    
This will cause the 'y' to get cut off (overlaid by the #nav). –  ScottS May 5 '12 at 2:16

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