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Are there any applicable differences between dict.items() and dict.iteritems()?

From the Python docs:

dict.items(): Return a copy of the dictionary’s list of (key, value) pairs.

dict.iteritems(): Return an iterator over the dictionary’s (key, value) pairs.

If I run the code below, each seems to return a reference to the same object. Are there any subtle differences that I am missing?

#!/usr/bin/python

d={1:'one',2:'two',3:'three'}
print 'd.items():'
for k,v in d.items():
   if d[k] is v: print '\tthey are the same object' 
   else: print '\tthey are different'

print 'd.iteritems():'   
for k,v in d.iteritems():
   if d[k] is v: print '\tthey are the same object' 
   else: print '\tthey are different'   

Output:

d.items():
    they are the same object
    they are the same object
    they are the same object
d.iteritems():
    they are the same object
    they are the same object
    they are the same object
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5  
It's basically a difference in how they are computed. items() creates the items all at once and returns a list. iteritems() returns a generator--a generator is an object that "creates" one item at a time every time next() is called on it. –  Joel Cornett May 5 '12 at 4:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 155 down vote accepted

It's part of an evolution.

Originally, Python items() built a real list of tuples and returned that. That could potentially take a lot of extra memory.

Then, generators were introduced to the language in general, and that method was reimplemented as a iterator-generator method named iteritems(). The original remains for backwards compatibility.

One of Python 3’s changes is that items() now return iterators, and a list is never fully built. The iteritems() method is also gone, since items() now works like iteritems() in Python 2.

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41  
Note that you have missed a step in the evolution: the Py3 behavior isn't the same as iteritems(). It actually makes a full sequence-protocol object that also reflects changes to the dict (and is backed by the dict itself, rather than a redundant list)- it's been backported to 2.7 as viewitems(). –  lvc May 5 '12 at 5:38

dict.items() returns a list of 2-tuples ([(key, value), (key, value), ...]), whereas dict.iteritems() is a generator that yields 2-tuples. The former takes more space and time initially, but accessing each element is fast, whereas the second takes less space and time initially, but a bit more time in generating each element.

share|improve this answer
    
Why is each element the same then? –  the wolf May 5 '12 at 3:03
6  
Why would you expect them to be different? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 5 '12 at 3:04
    
The "copy" in the docs doesn't mean that the elements are copied (if you want that, use copy.deepcopy). It means that it's a copy of the dictionary items: if you do items = dct.items() and then modify dct by adding/deleting keys or dct[k] = other_v, items will stay the same. –  Dougal May 5 '12 at 3:07
    
I did interpret 'copy' as meaning a deep copy and that the elements would be different... –  the wolf May 5 '12 at 4:12
2  
Nothing in Python is ever a deep copy unless explicitly documented as such. –  Karl Knechtel May 5 '12 at 4:21

You asked: 'Are there any applicable differences between dict.items() and dict.iteritems()'

This may help:

>>> d={1:'one',2:'two',3:'three'}
>>> type(d.items())
<type 'list'>
>>> type(d.iteritems())
<type 'dictionary-itemiterator'>

As a list, d.items() is slice-able:

>>> l1=d.items()[0]
>>> l1
(1, 'one')   # an unordered value!

But would not have an __iter__ method:

>>> next(d.items())
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: list object is not an iterator

As an iterator, d.iteritems() is not slice-able:

>>> i1=d.iteritems()[0]
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: 'dictionary-itemiterator' object is not subscriptable

But does have __iter__:

>>> next(d.iteritems())
(1, 'one')               # an unordered value!

So the items themselves are same -- the container delivering the items are different. One is a list, the other an iterator (depending on the Python version...) So the 'applicable differences' are the same as the applicable differences between a list and an iterator.

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In Py2.x :

dict.items(), dict.keys() and dict.values() return a copy of the dictionary's list of (k, v) pair, keys and values, which could takes a lot of memory if the copied list is very large.

dict.iteritems(), dict.iterkeys() and dict.itervalues() return an iterator over the dictionary’s (k, v) pair, keys and values

dict.viewitems(), dict.viewkeys() and dict.viewvalues() return the view objects, which can reflect the dictionary's changes (i.e. if you del an item or add a (k,v) pair in the dictionary, the view object can automatically change at the same time.)

$ python2.7

>>> d = {'one':1, 'two':2}
>>> type(d.items())
<type 'list'>
>>> type(d.keys())
<type 'list'>
>>> 
>>> 
>>> type(d.iteritems())
<type 'dictionary-itemiterator'>
>>> type(d.iterkeys())
<type 'dictionary-keyiterator'>
>>> 
>>> 
>>> type(d.viewitems())
<type 'dict_items'>
>>> type(d.viewkeys())
<type 'dict_keys'>


While in Py3.x, things are more clean, since there are only

dict.items(), dict.keys() and dict.values() available, which return the view objects just as dict.viewitems() in Py2.x did.

But just as @lvc noted, view object isn't the same as iterator, so if you want to return an iterator in Py3.x, you could use iter(dictview) :

$ python3.3

>>> d = {'one':'1', 'two':'2'}
>>> type(d.items())
<class 'dict_items'>
>>>
>>> type(d.keys())
<class 'dict_keys'>
>>>
>>>
>>> ii = iter(d.items())
>>> type(ii)
<class 'dict_itemiterator'>
>>>
>>> ik = iter(d.keys())
>>> type(ik)
<class 'dict_keyiterator'>
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