Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say I have a class like this:

public class MyClass {
...    
    public List<SomeClass> MyProperty {
        get { 
            SomeClass.GetCollectionOfThese(someId);
        } 
    }
...
}

GetCollectionOfThese() calls the database to retrieve the records necessary to build the collection. Now let's say I have the following code somewhere else:

MyClass obj = new MyClass(someId);
List<SomeClass> temp = obj.MyProperty;

...

SomeClass otherObj = obj.MyProperty.FirstOrDefault(i => i.Foo == "bar");

In this case, is the database being called two times? Or is the property value cached in memory?

share|improve this question
    
Did you run the code? What happened? Either way, that's your answer. When you have a question that is not answerable simply by running the code in the question, please post it. For example, say you wanted to change the behavior or fix it. But you do not need us to tell you what your code does, running it should do that. –  Anthony Pegram May 5 '12 at 4:25
    
well that's the problem, i wasn't sure. which is why i asked. –  Jason May 5 '12 at 4:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your implemenation will result in multiple database calls. You've got to do the caching, if that's what you need. Something like:

public class MyClass {
...    

    private List<SomeClass> _myProperty = null;
    public List<SomeClass> MyProperty {
        get { 
            if (_myProperty == null) _myProperty = SomeClass.GetCollectionOfThese(someId);
            return _myProperty;
        } 
    }
...
}

Of course, then you're probably going to want to give clients a way to refresh the cache.

share|improve this answer
    
perfect. this is what i'm looking for. thanks! –  Jason May 5 '12 at 4:24
1  
A more succinct way of writing that getter would be return _myProperty ?? (_myProperty = SomeClass.GetCollectionOfThese(someId)) –  Daniel Mann May 5 '12 at 4:26
    
ah yes, any chance to use null coalesce i'll take it ;) –  Jason May 5 '12 at 4:27

It depends on the technology that you use in your datalayer. For example if you use Linq2Sql with single DataContext, DataContext would cache entities for you and requery it from cache, so that you hit the DataBase only once. But that's not a typical scheme.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.