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I am looking for advice, because I get an error when I run the following code:

public class Test9 {


    public static void main(String[] args) {        

        Object [] myObjects = {
                 new Integer(12),
                 new String("foo"),
                 new Integer(5),
                 new Boolean(true)
                 };
                 Arrays.sort(myObjects);
                 for(int i=0; i<myObjects.length; i++) {
                 System.out.print(myObjects[i].toString());
                 //System.out.print(" ");
                 }

    }

}

The error I am getting is:

   Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ClassCastException: java.lang.String cannot be cast to java.lang.Integer
    at java.lang.Integer.compareTo(Unknown Source)
    at java.util.Arrays.mergeSort(Unknown Source)
    at java.util.Arrays.sort(Unknown Source)
    at Practicequestions.Test9.main(Test9.java:18)
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted
 Object [] myObjects = {
                 new Integer(12),
                 new String("foo"),
                 new Integer(5),
                 new Boolean(true)
                 };

This a generic type array. So when you trying to sort it with public static void sort(Object[] a) it populate runtime ClassCastException cause array contains elements that are not mutually comparable.

Array.sort() specified array of objects into ascending order, according to the natural ordering of its elements. There is a another method you can use it sort(Object[] a,Comparator c) . Implement Comparator with your own logic and pass it.

Object[] myObjects = { new Integer(12), new String("foo"),
                new Integer(5), new Boolean(true) };
        Comparator<Object> comparator=new Comparator<Object>() {
            @Override
            public int compare(Object obj1, Object obj2) {
                if(obj1 instanceof String && obj2 instanceof String){
                    return String.valueOf(obj1).compareTo(String.valueOf(obj2));
                }else if(obj1 instanceof Integer && obj2 instanceof Integer){
                    return ((Integer) obj1).compareTo((Integer) obj2);
                }else if(obj1 instanceof Boolean && obj2 instanceof Boolean){
                    return ((Boolean) obj1).compareTo((Boolean) obj2);
                }else if(obj1 instanceof String && obj2 instanceof Integer){
                    return 1;
                }else if(obj1 instanceof Integer && obj2 instanceof String){
                    return -1;
                }else if(obj1 instanceof Boolean){
                    return -1;
                }else if( obj2 instanceof Boolean){
                    return 1;
                }
                return 0;
            }
        }; 
        Arrays.sort(myObjects,comparator);
        for (int i = 0; i < myObjects.length; i++) {
            System.out.print(myObjects[i].toString());
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Please can you show a sample code of comparator for this above array , that will be a great help. – user1370546 May 5 '12 at 5:59
    
+1 Good job. OP can implement whatever suits as (s)he see fit, but this is a very reasonable starting point – Bohemian May 5 '12 at 7:45

I do believe that the issue you are facing stems from you calling Arrays.sort() on your array.

The sort will attempt to compare objects, but the types you posted cannot. Does it make sense to compare two integers, a string, and a boolean? They cannot be sorted, at least not without a custom comparator.

Try replacing the String and the Boolean with Integer's and try again.

EDIT: In bold, imprecise wording. The objects are never casted. They are compared using the compareTo function.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 Wrong!!!!!!! – Bohemian May 5 '12 at 5:42
    
How so? Look at the stack trace. ClassCastException. You cannot cast from String to Integer. – Luke Cycon May 5 '12 at 5:43
    
Dude that's NOT the problem. Read my answer – Bohemian May 5 '12 at 5:46
    
Conceptually, this is correct. I should say "because they cannot be compared", not "cannot be casted between", but the issue does stem from the fact that a String is not an integer. I know as well as you do the implementation of Integer.compareTo(), but that was not the issue the user had. He obviously doesn't understand why those cannot be compared. I'm not saying you are wrong, that is most definitely the reason why the exception was thrown. I was trying to also show the concept of sorts on a homogeneous array. – Luke Cycon May 5 '12 at 5:51

Sort won't convert your objects automatically to the same common type. you have to cast your objects to string before adding them to the collection.

Object [] myObjects = { 
                 new Integer(12).toString(), 
                 new String("foo"), 
                 new Integer(5).toString(), 
                 new Boolean(true).toString() 
                 }; 
Arrays.sort(myObjects); 
for(int i=0; i<myObjects.length; i++) { 
                 System.out.print(myObjects[i].toString()); 
                 //System.out.print(" "); 
} 

Of course I assume this is a theoretical question, your objects should already created and stored in some variable.

share|improve this answer
    
@Bohemian, if you have something to say, say it. "Wrong!!!!" IS THE WRONG ANSWER. Marked as unconstructive. – user694833 May 5 '12 at 5:49
    
OK. Fair enough. Your answer will avoid the exception (perhaps not resulting in correct program behaviour - correct behaviour is not defined by the OP), but does not explain why it is occurring, which is what the question is about. – Bohemian May 5 '12 at 5:55
    
The question is "I am looking for advice", so I adviced the author on a way to make it work. You can propose yours as well. – user694833 May 5 '12 at 5:59
    
The main problem I have with your answer is this text: you have to cast your objects to string... it's quite simply wrong. You can make them all Strings, which will avoid the error, but doing so changes the basic nature of the code in the question so much that it can't be considered an answer. One could just as easily say "just have one element in your array", which will also not get an error. Using toString() on all objects doesn't answer the question. – Bohemian May 5 '12 at 11:33
    
Thanks for sharing your opinion, please avoid debates. – user694833 May 5 '12 at 11:49

The answer to your problem is entirely in the stack trace.

Arrays.sort() requires that all elements in the array implement Comparable, and invokes the compareTo() method in order to sort the array.

The implementation of compareTo() in the Integer class throws an exception if the object being compared to is not another Integer.

The Arrays.sort() method does NOT try to "cast objects to the same type" as other answers have suggested. The cast exception occurs because the compareTo() of Integer is typed, but the invocation from Arrays.sort() is not typed.

share|improve this answer

The sort(Object[]) method is assuming that every object in the array implements Comparable, and using that method to compare the elements. When it tries to compare (for instance) the first and second elements, it calls Integer.compareTo(Object) with a String argument. The Integer.compareTo(Object) tries to cast the argument to an Integer, and that (naturally) fails, giving a ClassCastException.

The bottom line is that you (generally speaking) cannot use sort(Object[]) on an Object[] array unless:

  • the array elements are non-null,
  • the array elements all implement Comparable, and
  • all of the elements' compareTo() methods can cope with the types of all of the other elements.

In this case, the last is not true. The compareTo method of Integer only understands other Integer instances, and the compareTo method of String only understands other String instances.

If any of the preconditions above is not satisfied, you need to use the Arrays.sort(Object[], Comparator) method, and supply a Comparator that works for all of the elements in your array.


Incidentally, this illustrates why arrays and collections of mixed types are generally a bad idea. It is awkward to deal with a bunch of different things when you don't know what their types are going to be,.

share|improve this answer

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