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I'm completely new to databases, and have put something simple together using the helpful guide that can be located at http://halfcooked.com/presentations/osdc2006/python_databases.html , However it's returning an error that I don't understand

try:
    from sqlite3 import dbapi2 as sqlite
except ImportError:
    from pysqlite2 import dbapi2 as sqlite

db_connection = sqlite.connect('program.db')

db_curs = db_connection.cursor()

def create_customer(cID, fname, sname, dob):
    db_curs.execute("CREATE TABLE " + cID + " ( id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, first_name VARCHAR(20),last_name VARCHAR(30), date_of_birth DATE)")
    db_curs.execute("INSERT INTO " + cID + " (first_name, last_name, date_of_birth) VALUES (fname, sname, dob)")
    db_connection.commit()
    db_curs.execute("SELECT * FROM " + cID )

create_customer("1", "John", "Farnham", "12/08/95")
create_customer("1", "Indianna", "Jones", "05/05/95")


print db_curs.fetchall()

the error I am receiving is as follows:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:\Users\fin0005\Documents\loyalty.py", line 17, in <module>
    create_customer("1", "John", "Farnham", "12/08/95")
  File "C:\Users\fin0005\Documents\loyalty.py", line 12, in create_customer
    db_curs.execute("CREATE TABLE " + cID + " ( id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, first_name VARCHAR(20),last_name VARCHAR(30), date_of_birth DATE)")
OperationalError: near "1": syntax error
share|improve this question
    
WHY would you call a table "1"?! –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 5 '12 at 6:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Add backticks around your table name, so that it doesn't think it's creating an integer as a table name

def create_customer(cID, fname, sname, dob):
    db_curs.execute("CREATE TABLE `" + cID + "` ( id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, first_name VARCHAR(20),last_name VARCHAR(30), date_of_birth DATE)")
    db_curs.execute("INSERT INTO `" + cID + "` (first_name, last_name, date_of_birth) VALUES (fname, sname, dob)")
    db_connection.commit()
    db_curs.execute("SELECT * FROM `" + cID  + "`")

# In SQL terms, the following blows up
# create table 2 (id int(10) PRIMARY KEY); Due to the 2 being an integer
# create table `2` (id int(10) PRIMARY KEY); Works, due to the 2 being properly identified with backticks :)

# Here's some code as requested in the comment, everything below this point is a self contained example, please do not copy the function above
def initiate_customer_table(table_name):
    db_curs.execute("CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `" + table_name + "` ( id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, first_name VARCHAR(20),last_name VARCHAR(30), date_of_birth DATE)")
    db_connection.commit()       

def create_customer(table_name, fname, sname, dob):
    db_curs.execute("INSERT INTO `" + table_name + "` (first_name, last_name, date_of_birth) VALUES (%s, %s, %s)", [fname, sname, dob])
    db_connection.commit()

    # Fetches the user just created
    db_curs.execute("SELECT * FROM `" + table_name  + "` WHERE id = %s", [db_curs.insert_id()])

    # Returns the user
    return db_curs.fetchone()


desired_table_name = 'customers'

initiate_customer_table(desired_table_name)

customer_1 = create_customer(desired_table_name, "Bryan", "Moyles", "1800-01-01")
customer_2 = create_customer(desired_table_name, "Awesome", "Guy", "1800-01-01")

I will also suggest that you go a step further, if you plan on using this code in production, to ensure that all fields are escaped properly for mysql.

share|improve this answer
2  
plus note that the second create_customer("1", "Indianna", "Jones", "05/05/95") will fail and 1 is absolutely not a good table name. The OP might gets confused between table name and primary key column –  okm May 5 '12 at 6:04
    
Very good point! It will indeed, due to the fact that 1 has already been taken as a table name. I will also second @okm, and say that integers as table names are not good practice at all. You want to be descriptive when creating tables, and your create_customer method should actually just be responsible for adding a record to the customer table, not creating the entire table itself –  Bryan May 5 '12 at 6:06
    
I don't see that you copied the line that I provided for the INSERT, please copy the entire function I provided and try it again :) –  Bryan May 5 '12 at 6:14
    
ohh! I understand what you did, @BryanMoyles :) Thank you for your help! I seem to still be a little confused about the correct usage of this database, however, as I am receiving the error OperationalError: no such column: John - Would you be kind enough as to provide an example (or tutorial) of adding a record to the customer table, rather than creating an individual table for each customer? Thank you (both) very much for your help, once again! :) –  abkai May 5 '12 at 6:21
    
You're very welcome, thank you for your positive energy! I've added to the original code, an example where you initiate the table once, and then create customers in that table. Please only copy the code below the new code, when attempting to use it :) –  Bryan May 5 '12 at 6:38

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