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suppose i have a list

a=[1,2,3,4,5]  

now i want to convert this int a tuple
i thought coding something like this will do

state=()  
for i in a:  
    state=state+i

and it gave error(well its quite obvious) i am trying to concatinate int with tuple

but tuples doesn't have any functions like insert or append like lists..
so how through looping i can add elements.. same thing with dictionary i feel as if i have a missing link

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1  
what's bad with tuple(a) ? –  joaquin May 5 '12 at 6:06
    
nothings bad .. i wanted to have more control over the list so that i can dynamically add data when ever i want...using tuple(a) would give (1,2,3,4,5) what if i want to add 6,7,8,9,0 in the same list... i wanted a generalised solution –  user784530 May 5 '12 at 6:12
1  
If you want to edit it, a tuple is not your answer, just use a list. The exact point of a tuple is to be an immutable list. –  Josiah May 5 '12 at 6:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Tuples are immutable, you cannot append, delete, or edit them at all. If you want to turn a list into a tuple, you can just use the tuple function:

tuple(a)

If, for some reason, you feel the need to append to a tuple (You should never do this), you can always turn it back into a list, append, then turn it back into a tuple:

tuple(list(a)+b)
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4  
"You should never do this" may not be helpful advice, since you can't append to a tuple :), but it is frequently useful to generate a new tuple that is the same as the old one with more elements added. Also, it's not necessary to turn a into a list in your second example; it should probably be just a + tuple(b) or a + (b,) if b is an element to add instead of an iterable. –  the paul May 5 '12 at 22:35
>>> a = [1,2,3,4,5]
>>> tuple(a)
(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
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ok..thats like sets...using loops –  user784530 May 5 '12 at 6:09

tuple is not mutable in python.

so after you initial it with tuple(...), it can't be modified.

a = [1,2,3,4,5]
tuple(a) 
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