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Table:

CREATE TABLE `test` (
  `uid` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `rating` smallint(5) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '100',
  PRIMARY KEY (`uid`),
  KEY `rating` (`rating`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

This query runs quick enough(0.015s):

SELECT uid FROM test ORDER BY rating DESC LIMIT 0,100

But with big LIMIT offsets it runs very slow(2.215s):

SELECT uid FROM test ORDER BY rating DESC LIMIT 10000,100

How can I rid of huge LIMIT offsets?!

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1  
Can you edit your question and add the query time in booth cases? So we can understand what you mean for "slow" and "quick enough" –  kappa May 5 '12 at 6:20
    
@kappa added time measures –  Didar_Uranov May 5 '12 at 6:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The easiest way to improve performance is to ORDER BY a primary key.

Since you can't really do that with the rating column, you can cheat instead.

Create this table:

CREATE TABLE `test_ranks` (
  `id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `uid` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8

Then put the following in a cron script that runs every X amount of time (1 minute, 5 minutes... basically a good compromise between update speed and the time it takes to run):

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE `_tmp_test_ranks` (
  `id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `uid` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

INSERT INTO `_tmp_test_ranks` (`uid`) VALUES (SELECT `uid` FROM `test` ORDER BY `rating` DESC);

TRUNCATE `test_ranks`;

INSERT INTO `test_ranks` SELECT * from `_tmp_test_ranks`;

DROP TABLE `_tmp_test_ranks`;

Now, instead of your slow-running select, you can run the faster:

SELECT `uid` FROM `test_ranks` WHERE `id` BETWEEN 10000 AND 10100 ORDER BY `id` ASC
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Who downvoted, and why? –  Niet the Dark Absol May 5 '12 at 6:15
1  
Isn't rating already a covering index in this case? I didn't down vote. –  Ami May 5 '12 at 6:15
    
@Kolink, your solution is awesome! Please correct this query: INSERT INTO _tmp_test_ranks (uid) VALUES (SELECT uid FROM test ORDER BY rating DESC); to INSERT INTO _tmp_test_ranks (uid) (SELECT uid FROM test ORDER BY rating DESC); –  Didar_Uranov May 5 '12 at 8:24
    
@Kolink, the final SELECT query with LIMIT runs also **slow**(1.4s). Instead of using LIMIT, use BETWEEN like this: SELECT uid FROM test_ranks WHERE id BETWEEN 10000 AND 10100 ORDER BY id ASC. This is really fast. Correct your answer and I will accept it! –  Didar_Uranov May 5 '12 at 8:28
    
What for TEMPORARY table is ? –  Didar_Uranov May 5 '12 at 9:19

With LIMIT 10000, 100 MySQL has to scan through 10100 records. If you could remember your spot in the window, it might be better:

SELECT uid
FROM test
WHERE rating > :last_rating
ORDER BY rating DESC LIMIT 0,100

In this case :last_rating was the last rating from the previous query.

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@Didar_Uranov, you're right. Sorry, I meant rating. :) Fixing it now. –  Ami May 5 '12 at 6:26
    
This technique is good for "Previous" <-> "Next" Pagination. My upvote for you. I've deleted my above comment. –  Didar_Uranov May 5 '12 at 6:30
1  
be careful because you may loose some result in that way: rating space is smaller than uid space –  kappa May 5 '12 at 6:44
1  
and it's not ensured you have exactly 100 results for each rating value –  kappa May 5 '12 at 6:55

As far as I know, and after doing a little bit of digging, there's really no way for you to set a maximum limit in the database's config or anything like that. It will be up to the developer of the application implementing your database, to ensure that the maximum values are established within the application's logic.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not going to forbid somebody executing such queries. Just want to know how to optimize huge LIMIT offsets and rid of them. –  Didar_Uranov May 5 '12 at 7:03

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