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I've been creating a node_add function, that works properly to me, but I'm having a hard time creating a node_delete one.

Here is what I wrote:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
typedef struct friend // The struct
{
   char *name; 
   int age;
   char gender; 
   struct friend* next; // A pointer that points to the next node in the linked list
}friend;
void node_delete(); // The deleting node function
friend* head; // Definging the head of the linked list
void node_delete() // Deleting a node
{
 char name[256];
 printf ("Please enter the friend's name you want to delete: \n");
 fgets (name, 256, stdin);
 fgets (name, 256, stdin); // Getting the name of the person that the user wants to delete
 while (head -> next != NULL) // As long the node isnt the last one
 {
       if (0 == (strcmp(head -> name, name))) // If the name that the user entered matchs a name in the linked list,
       { // It'll skip it
             head -> next = head -> next -> next; // Deletes a node from the linked list
       }
       head -> next; // Going to the next node
}
 free(head); // Freeing the deleted node
}

I only have a problem in the delete node function

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Bart, Rohan, Blachshma, Mario Sannum, Oldskool Jan 6 '13 at 14:31

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
It would certainly help if you could give us only the part of code making problems. Furthermore, describing what your actual problem is might also be a good idea. – Thilo May 5 '12 at 6:09
    
I've added it.. :) – user1390162 May 5 '12 at 7:07
up vote 1 down vote accepted
if (head) {
  if (strcmp(head->name, name) == 0) {
    to_free = head;
    head = head->next;
    free(to_free);
  } else {
    list = head;
    while (list->next) {
      if (strcmp(list->next->name, name) == 0) {
        to_free = list->next;
        list->next = list->next->next;
        free(to_free);
        break; // if only one
      }
      list = list->next;
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
jdizzle's answer and mine are doing the same, but mine is more 'explicit' whilst jdizzle's goes much deeper into C-coding-fundamentals. – Peter Miehle May 5 '12 at 8:52
    
As I said in the other solution, what do I put inside the head? I've had pretty trouble in it... I mean when I do friend* head, what do I put inside the head ? – user1390162 May 5 '12 at 11:20
    
hmm, i do not grok your question. you have a linked list: a variable called head, that points to the first element of the list, and the linkage is done by the ->next pointer. if you traverse the linked list, you get yourself a new pointer (like list or tmp) and initially point it to the same as head does, and traverse it by following the ->next. now you have three cases, if you want to delete: your list is empty=> nothing to do; your first element (the one which head points to) is the match, so your (one and only) head-pointer has to point to the next element in list; or you remove middle one – Peter Miehle May 5 '12 at 19:03
struct friend **tmp = &head;
while (*tmp != NULL && (0 != (strcmp((*tmp)->name, name)))) {
  tmp = &((*tmp)->next);
}
if (*tmp) {
  struct friend *freeme = (*tmp);
  (*tmp) = (*tmp)->next;
  free(freeme);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
you forget the free(); and do you really believe, the original poster groks this? – Peter Miehle May 5 '12 at 8:12
1  
If he stares long enough to understand it, it will open a whole new world to him. – jdizzle May 5 '12 at 8:27
1  
you are right :-) nice point of view. – Peter Miehle May 5 '12 at 8:49
    
In the first line, u wrote **tmp = &head... though, I didnt know how to define head... or what to put inside... Also, why do I need a double **? a pointer to the pointer? – user1390162 May 5 '12 at 11:18
    
you knoweth and you grok the concept of pointers? a pointer is a variable that points to something (normally a point in space). that is the asterix. A pointer to a pointer is called indirection. – Peter Miehle May 5 '12 at 19:07

look at this a little bit closer.

while (head -> next != NULL) // As long the node isnt the last one
 {
       if (0 == (strcmp(head -> name, name))) // If the name that the user entered matchs a name in the linked list,
       { // It'll skip it
             head -> next = head -> next -> next; // Deletes a node from the linked list
       }
       head -> next; // Going to the next node
}

it does not actually traverse the linked list

  head -> next; // Going to the next node

you should probably make head = head -> next

also, if "head" is the only thing holding on to the front of the linked list, making head = head->next will cause you to loose part of the list. I recommend creating a temporary pointer so temp = head. Then traverse the temp pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
Caution: The node that is removed from the linked list currently is head->next, while head should be deleted. Thus, you should probably reformulate your condition. – Thilo May 5 '12 at 6:18
    
I understand what u said, though I have 1 problem.... I dont know how to define head.. How can I make the head, to point to the head of the linked list ? – user1390162 May 5 '12 at 7:06