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What type of hash does Wordpress use?
Here is an example of a Wordpress hash:

$P$Bp.ZDNMM98mGNxCtHSkc1DqdRPXeoR.

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5 Answers

The Wordpress password hasher implements the Portable PHP password hashing framework, which is used in content management systems like Wordpress and Drupal.

They used to use md5 in the older versions, but sadly for me, no more. You can generate hashes using this encryption scheme at http://scriptserver.mainframe8.com/wordpress_password_hasher.php.

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+1 for the wp password hasher –  Jules Colle May 17 '13 at 13:13
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is someone comes across this old question like I did please note that MD5 is no longer acceptable. if you have >PHP 5.5.0 use the new password_hash function. if you only have >PHP 5.3.7 use the compatibility library here github.com/ircmaxell/password_compat –  Andrew Brown Dec 16 '13 at 19:37
    
didn't work for me. Does this still works ? –  Francisco Corrales Apr 2 at 20:35
    
it's there something to decrypt, to pass the '$P$Bp.ZDN....' to text. –  Francisco Corrales Apr 2 at 23:25
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$hash_type$salt$password

If the hash does not use a salt, then there is no $ sign for that. The actual hash in your case is after the 2nd $

The reason for this is so you can have many types of hashes with different salts and feed that string into a function that knows how to match it with some other value.

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thanks but i thought md5 hashes had to be in hex, like this: b1946ac92492d2347c6235b4d2611184 why does this hash have chars A-Z and . in it? is it a md5 hash? –  Amanda Kumar Jun 25 '09 at 21:00
    
Could be that type of hash that is used. A Hash is just a fixed size string. Could contain anything you want. –  Ólafur Waage Jun 25 '09 at 21:43
    
@Amanda Kumar. Extremely late to this party, but MD5 produces a 128-bit (16-byte) value. That value can be stored and represented in different ways, for example as a hex string, a Base64 string, or raw data in a file. You commonly see MD5 values represented in hex, however WordPress uses Base64 instead. Your hex value would be sZRqySSS0jR8YjW00mERhA== in Base64, which uses 25% less characters than hex to represent the same data. –  Jordan Feb 19 '13 at 20:58
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It depends at least on the version of PHP that is used. wp-includes/class-phpass.php contains all the answers.

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MD5 worked for me changing my database manually: http://codex.wordpress.org/Resetting_Your_Password

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no this isn't a plain md5 hash, plain md5 hashes look like this: b1946ac92492d2347c6235b4d2611184 i've heard it's based on md5, but can someone please tell me what type of hash it uses and what option to seelect in passwordspro –  Amanda Kumar Jun 25 '09 at 20:24
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MD5 will work if entered manually into the table, but upon first login WP will rewrite it using its own hash so it works great for resetting the password but not more than that. –  GiladG Jun 28 '09 at 6:39
    
didn't work for me. Does this still works ? –  Francisco Corrales Apr 2 at 22:03
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Start phpMyAdmin and access wp_users from your wordpress instance. Edit record and select user_pass function to match MD5. Write the string that will be your new password in VALUE. Click, GO. Go to your wordpress website and enter your new password. Back to phpMyAdmin you will see that WP changed the HASH to something like $P$B... enjoy!

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