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I was wondering if is possible to group each single RadioButton in a unique RadioGroup maintaining the same structure. My structure look like this:

  • LinearLayout_main
    • LinearLayout_1
      • RadioButton1
    • LinearLayout_2
      • RadioButton2
    • LinearLayout_3
      • RadioButton3

As you can see, now each RadioButton is a child of different LinearLayout. I tried using the structure below, but it doesn't work:

  • Radiogroup
    • LinearLayout_main
      • LinearLayout_1
        • RadioButton1
      • LinearLayout_2
        • RadioButton2
      • LinearLayout_3
        • RadioButton3
share|improve this question
1  
I am forced to ask what do you wish to achieve by doing this? –  Gaurav Agarwal May 5 '12 at 10:40
3  
@coding crow, if you're forced to ask then you've never worked with a designer for UI flow (and I'm guessing your radio buttons probably aren't very sophisticated). Imagine (if you can) a radio button that sits next to two pieces of text, one that is a headline and one that is a subtext. Now imagine 5 of these on top of one another. How do you accomplish that? Ah right... you can't. It's a good thing that nothing so fancy was ever needed or google would really look foolish having overlooked such basic layout functionality in their otherwise comprehensive layout toolset. –  Genia S. Apr 13 '13 at 1:31
    
@Dr.Dredel wow, although I agree with what u say (usage of radioButtons), but maybe your reaction was too emotional? :) –  infografnet Apr 17 '13 at 20:45
5  
It wasn't emotional so much as clearly annoyed. What does that comment offer to the OP? What does it offer to the thread in general? It implies that the question is without merit and is impatient and snarky. If he had started it with "Could you please explain why you would want to do this" that would be both appropriate and polite. "I am forced to ask" is a thinly veiled alternative to "what sort of idiot would need this wacky kluge?". At least that's how I read it. –  Genia S. Apr 17 '13 at 21:29

7 Answers 7

It seems that the good people at Google/Android assume that when you use RadioButtons, you don't need the flexibility that comes with every other aspect of the Android UI/layout system. To put it simply: they don't want you to nest layouts and radio buttons. Sigh.

So you gotta work around the problem. That means you must implement radio buttons on your own.

This really isn't too hard. In your onCreate(), set your RadioButtons with their own onClick() so that when they are activated, they setChecked(true) and do the opposite for the other buttons. For example:

class FooActivity {

RadioButton m_one, m_two, m_three;

@Override
protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    ...
    m_one = (RadioButton) findViewById(R.id.first_radio_button);
    m_two = (RadioButton) findViewById(R.id.second_radio_button);
    m_three = (RadioButton) findViewById(R.id.third_radio_button);

    m_one.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(View v) {
            m_one.setChecked(true);
            m_two.setChecked(false);
            m_three.setChecked(false);
        }
    });

    m_two.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(View v) {
            m_one.setChecked(false);
            m_two.setChecked(true);
            m_three.setChecked(false);
        }
    });

    m_three.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(View v) {
            m_one.setChecked(false);
            m_two.setChecked(false);
            m_three.setChecked(true);
        }
    });

    ...     
} // onCreate() 

}

Yeah, I know--way old-school. But it works. Good luck!

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the example. And yes... often the best solution is the simplest. –  marcoqf73 Nov 13 '12 at 21:03
3  
infuriating. simply unbelievable that this is the level of klugery necessary to do something as mundane as a "radio button". It's beyond belief that Google hands us so many short cuts for things that are almost entirely useless (like 80% of the Animations widgetry) and then leaves us to spackle together our own radio buttons. (spit!). –  Genia S. Apr 13 '13 at 1:27
1  
@Dr.Dredel: Yeah, I agree that a lot of their UI choices are bizarre. My only guess about this limitation is they may be thinking, "It's really not that hard to do it manually." But it would have been nice if they documented this lack of feature at least a little bit (like a tutorial page?). As you point out, they've gone waaaay overboard on other nearly useless things (pet projects, perhaps?). –  Scott Biggs Apr 14 '13 at 16:48
1  
I can only guess, but my overall impression is that Android's UI team is either given short shrift or is just generally fairly weak. Consider what passes for "elegant" in the google universe. It's all really spartan and utilitarian. I'm not a fan of Apple because I prefer functionality to style, but if ever a mega-company with hordes of cash needed to rethink its look and feel (up and down the chain) I can't think of a better candidate than Google. –  Genia S. Apr 14 '13 at 22:10
1  
This is by far one of the most reliable and simple solutions there is... although prehistoric, it's a shame Google has not implemented something more efficient... –  T.V. Jan 9 at 10:05

Well, I wrote this simple class.

Just use it like this:

// add any number of RadioButton resource IDs here
GRadioGroup gr = new GRadioGroup(this, 
    R.id.radioButton1, R.id.radioButton2, R.id.radioButton3);

or

GRadioGroup gr = new GRadioGroup(rb1, rb2, rb3);
// where RadioButton rb1 = (RadioButton) findViewById(R.id.radioButton1);
// etc.

You can call it in onCreate() of Activity for example. No matter which RadioButton you click, the others will become unchecked. Also, no matters, if some of RadioButtons are inside of some RadioGroup, or not.

Here's the class:

package pl.infografnet.GClasses;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

import android.view.View;
import android.view.View.OnClickListener;
import android.view.ViewParent;
import android.widget.RadioButton;
import android.widget.RadioGroup;

public class GRadioGroup {

    List<RadioButton> radios = new ArrayList<RadioButton>();

    /**
     * Constructor, which allows you to pass number of RadioButton instances,
     * making a group.
     * 
     * @param radios
     *            One RadioButton or more.
     */
    public GRadioGroup(RadioButton... radios) {
        super();

        for (RadioButton rb : radios) {
            this.radios.add(rb);
            rb.setOnClickListener(onClick);
        }
    }

    /**
     * Constructor, which allows you to pass number of RadioButtons 
     * represented by resource IDs, making a group.
     * 
     * @param activity
     *            Current View (or Activity) to which those RadioButtons 
     *            belong.
     * @param radiosIDs
     *            One RadioButton or more.
     */
    public GRadioGroup(View activity, int... radiosIDs) {
        super();

        for (int radioButtonID : radiosIDs) {
            RadioButton rb = (RadioButton)activity.findViewById(radioButtonID);
            if (rb != null) {
                this.radios.add(rb);
                rb.setOnClickListener(onClick);
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * This occurs everytime when one of RadioButtons is clicked, 
     * and deselects all others in the group.
     */
    OnClickListener onClick = new OnClickListener() {

        @Override
        public void onClick(View v) {

            // let's deselect all radios in group
            for (RadioButton rb : radios) {

                ViewParent p = rb.getParent();
                if (p.getClass().equals(RadioGroup.class)) {
                    // if RadioButton belongs to RadioGroup, 
                    // then deselect all radios in it 
                    RadioGroup rg = (RadioGroup) p;
                    rg.clearCheck();
                } else {
                    // if RadioButton DOES NOT belong to RadioGroup, 
                    // just deselect it
                    rb.setChecked(false);
                }
            }

            // now let's select currently clicked RadioButton
            if (v.getClass().equals(RadioButton.class)) {
                RadioButton rb = (RadioButton) v;
                rb.setChecked(true);
            }

        }
    };

}
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice. If you replace RadioButton with the super class CompoundButton then it's even better, as you can then add any toggleable buttons (such as ToggleButton) to the group! –  Neromancer Sep 19 '13 at 21:54
    
It's worth noting that performing getCheckedRadioButtonId() from your regular radio group will no longer work (always returns -1) if the radio buttons are not directly nested in the radio group. I added another method to the class above as follows: ` /** * Returns the Id of the radio button that is checked or -1 if none are checked * @return */ public int getCheckedRadioButtonId() { int checkedId = -1; // Loop each radio button for (RadioButton rb : radios) { if (rb.isChecked()) { return rb.getId(); } } return checkedId; }` –  sham Jun 30 at 22:19

There is nothing stopping you from implementing that layout structure(RadioGroup is in fact a subclass of LinearLayout) but you shouldn't. First of all you create a structure 4 levels deep(using another layout structure you could optimize this) and second, if your RadioButtons are not direct children of a RadioGroup, the only one item selected in group will not work. This means that if you select a Radiobutton from that layout and then select another RadioButton you'll end up with two RadioButtons selected instead of the last selected one.

If you explain what you want to do in that layout maybe I can recommend you an alternative.

share|improve this answer
    
Luksprog, Thanks for your explanation. If I understand right if RadioButtons are not direct children of a radio group it will not work. –  marcoqf73 May 11 '12 at 7:41
    
@marcoqf73 Yes, to put it more simple, if you have anything in the layout between the RadioButtons and the parent RadioGroup then this will not work like usual and basically you'll end up with a LinearLayout filled with RadioButtons. –  Luksprog May 11 '12 at 7:46
1  
There are bunches of reasons to do something like this. For example you may want to have more control of your layouts than a simple LinearLayout; in my case, I want to make multiple rows of RadioButtons. Nesting layouts is how pretty much EVERY Android layout works. Bah, I'm sick of hearing, "You can't do that," while searching for solutions to these UI quirks, which I get about every other day. :( –  Scott Biggs Nov 7 '12 at 7:01
    
@ScottBiggs I didn't say you can't do that, I said that trying what the user who asked the question will not work. You are free to implement your own layout(but is not that easy to get it right) or use a trick like in this answer of mine stackoverflow.com/questions/10425569/… . –  Luksprog Nov 7 '12 at 7:50
    
I created a radiogroup class that extended table layout and added features from the radiogroup class. It works quite well with an unlimited number of columns adding the radio buttons dynamically. stackoverflow.com/questions/10425569/… –  Kristy Welsh Mar 19 at 17:31

Use this class that I created. It will find all checkable children in your hierarchy.

import java.util.ArrayList;

import android.content.Context;
import android.util.AttributeSet;
import android.view.View;
import android.view.ViewGroup;
import android.widget.Checkable;
import android.widget.LinearLayout;

public class MyRadioGroup extends LinearLayout {

private ArrayList<View> mCheckables = new ArrayList<View>();

public MyRadioGroup(Context context) {
    super(context);
}

public MyRadioGroup(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
    this(context, attrs, 0);
}

public MyRadioGroup(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, int defStyle) {
    super(context, attrs, defStyle);
}

@Override
public void addView(View child, int index,
        android.view.ViewGroup.LayoutParams params) {
    super.addView(child, index, params);
    parseChild(child);
}

public void parseChild(final View child)
{
    if(child instanceof Checkable)
    {
        mCheckables.add(child);
        child.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {

            public void onClick(View v) {
                for(int i = 0; i < mCheckables.size();i++)
                {
                    Checkable view = (Checkable) mCheckables.get(i);
                    if(view == v)
                    {
                        ((Checkable)view).setChecked(true);
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        ((Checkable)view).setChecked(false);
                    }
                }
            }
        });
    }
    else if(child instanceof ViewGroup)
    {
        parseChildren((ViewGroup)child);
    }
}

public void parseChildren(final ViewGroup child)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < child.getChildCount();i++)
    {
        parseChild(child.getChildAt(i));
    }
}
}
share|improve this answer

I've written my own radio group class that allows to contain nested radio buttons. Check it out. If you find bugs, please let me know.

import android.content.Context;
import android.util.AttributeSet;
import android.view.View;
import android.view.ViewGroup;
import android.widget.CompoundButton;
import android.widget.LinearLayout;

/**
 * This class is used to create a multiple-exclusion scope for a set of compound
 * buttons. Checking one compound button that belongs to a group unchecks any
 * previously checked compound button within the same group. Intially, all of
 * the compound buttons are unchecked. While it is not possible to uncheck a
 * particular compound button, the group can be cleared to remove the checked
 * state. Basically, this class extends functionality of
 * {@link android.widget.RadioGroup} because it doesn't require that compound
 * buttons are direct childs of the group. This means you can wrap compound
 * buttons with other views. <br>
 * <br>
 * 
 * <b>IMPORTATNT! Follow these instruction when using this class:</b><br>
 * 1. Each direct child of this group must contain one compound button or be
 * compound button itself.<br>
 * 2. Do not set any "on click" or "on checked changed" listeners for the childs
 * of this group.
 */
public class CompoundButtonsGroup extends LinearLayout {

 private View checkedView;
 private OnCheckedChangeListener listener;
 private OnHierarchyChangeListener onHierarchyChangeListener;

 private OnHierarchyChangeListener onHierarchyChangeListenerInternal = new OnHierarchyChangeListener() {

  @Override
  public final void onChildViewAdded(View parent, View child) {
   notifyHierarchyChanged(null);
   if (CompoundButtonsGroup.this.onHierarchyChangeListener != null) {
    CompoundButtonsGroup.this.onHierarchyChangeListener.onChildViewAdded(
      parent, child);
   }
  }

  @Override
  public final void onChildViewRemoved(View parent, View child) {
   notifyHierarchyChanged(child);
   if (CompoundButtonsGroup.this.onHierarchyChangeListener != null) {
    CompoundButtonsGroup.this.onHierarchyChangeListener.onChildViewRemoved(
      parent, child);
   }
  }
 };

 public CompoundButtonsGroup(Context context) {
  super(context);
  init();
 }

 public CompoundButtonsGroup(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
  super(context, attrs);
  init();
 }

 public CompoundButtonsGroup(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, int defStyle) {
  super(context, attrs, defStyle);
  init();
 }

 private void init() {
  super.setOnHierarchyChangeListener(this.onHierarchyChangeListenerInternal);
 }

 @Override
 public final void setOnHierarchyChangeListener(OnHierarchyChangeListener listener) {
  this.onHierarchyChangeListener = listener;
 }

 /**
  * Register a callback to be invoked when the checked view changes in this
  * group.
  * 
  * @param listener
  *            the callback to call on checked state change.
  */
 public void setOnCheckedChangeListener(OnCheckedChangeListener listener) {
  this.listener = listener;
 }

 /**
  * Returns currently selected view in this group. Upon empty selection, the
  * returned value is null.
  */
 public View getCheckedView() {
  return this.checkedView;
 }

 /**
  * Returns index of currently selected view in this group. Upon empty
  * selection, the returned value is -1.
  */
 public int getCheckedViewIndex() {
  return (this.checkedView != null) ? indexOfChild(this.checkedView) : -1;
 }

 /**
  * Sets the selection to the view whose index in group is passed in
  * parameter.
  * 
  * @param index
  *            the index of the view to select in this group.
  */
 public void check(int index) {
  check(getChildAt(index));
 }

 /**
  * Clears the selection. When the selection is cleared, no view in this
  * group is selected and {@link #getCheckedView()} returns null.
  */
 public void clearCheck() {
  if (this.checkedView != null) {
   findCompoundButton(this.checkedView).setChecked(false);
   this.checkedView = null;
   onCheckedChanged();
  }
 }

 private void onCheckedChanged() {
  if (this.listener != null) {
   this.listener.onCheckedChanged(this.checkedView);
  }
 }

 private void check(View child) {
  if (this.checkedView == null || !this.checkedView.equals(child)) {
   if (this.checkedView != null) {
    findCompoundButton(this.checkedView).setChecked(false);
   }

   CompoundButton comBtn = findCompoundButton(child);
   comBtn.setChecked(true);

   this.checkedView = child;
   onCheckedChanged();
  }
 }

 private void notifyHierarchyChanged(View removedView) {
  for (int i = 0; i < getChildCount(); i++) {
   View child = getChildAt(i);
   child.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {

    @Override
    public void onClick(View v) {
     check(v);
    }
   });
   CompoundButton comBtn = findCompoundButton(child);
   comBtn.setClickable(comBtn.equals(child));
  }

  if (this.checkedView != null && removedView != null
    && this.checkedView.equals(removedView)) {
   clearCheck();
  }
 }

 private CompoundButton findCompoundButton(View view) {
  if (view instanceof CompoundButton) {
   return (CompoundButton) view;
  }

  if (view instanceof ViewGroup) {
   for (int i = 0; i < ((ViewGroup) view).getChildCount(); i++) {
    CompoundButton compoundBtn = findCompoundButton(((ViewGroup) view)
      .getChildAt(i));
    if (compoundBtn != null) {
     return compoundBtn;
    }
   }
  }

  return null;
 }

 /**
  * Interface definition for a callback to be invoked when the checked view
  * changed in this group.
  */
 public interface OnCheckedChangeListener {

  /**
   * Called when the checked view has changed.
   * 
   * @param checkedView
   *            newly checked view or null if selection was cleared in the
   *            group.
   */
  public void onCheckedChanged(View checkedView);
 }

}
share|improve this answer

While this maybe an older topic, i would like to quickly share simple hacky code i wrote.. Its not for everyone and could do with some refinement as well..

The situation to use this code??
This code is for people who have a layout of the original question or similar, in my case it was as below. This personally was for a Dialog that i was using.

  • LinLayout_Main
    • LinLayout_Row1
      • ImageView
      • RadioButton
    • LinLayout_Row2
      • ImageView
      • RadioButton
    • LinLayout_Row3
      • ImageView
      • RadioButton

What does the code do itself??
This code will enumerate ever Child of "LinLayout_Main" and for each child that is a "LinearLayout" it will then enumerate that View for any RadioButtons.

Simply it will look the parent "LinLayout_Main" and find any RadioButtons that are in any Child LinearLayouts.

MyMethod_ShowDialog
Will show a dialog with a XML layout file while also looking it to set the "setOnClickListener" for each RadioButton it finds

MyMethod_ClickRadio
Will loop each RadioButton the same way "MyMethod_ShowDialog" does but instead of setting the "setOnClickListener" it will instead "setChecked(false)" to clear each RadioButton and then as the last step will "setChecked(false)" to the RadioButton that called the click event.

public void MyMethod_ShowDialog(final double tmpLat, final double tmpLng) {
        final Dialog dialog = new Dialog(actMain);
        dialog.requestWindowFeature(Window.FEATURE_NO_TITLE);
        dialog.setContentView(R.layout.layout_dialogXML);

        final LinearLayout tmpLayMain = (LinearLayout)dialog.findViewById(R.id.LinLayout_Main);
        if (tmpLayMain!=null) {
            // Perform look for each child of main LinearLayout
            int iChildCount1 = tmpLayMain.getChildCount();
            for (int iLoop1=0; iLoop1 < iChildCount1; iLoop1++){
                View tmpChild1 = tmpLayMain.getChildAt(iLoop1);
                if (tmpChild1 instanceof LinearLayout) {
                    // Perform look for each LinearLayout child of main LinearLayout
                    int iChildCount2 = ((LinearLayout) tmpChild1).getChildCount();
                    for (int iLoop2=0; iLoop2 < iChildCount2; iLoop2++){
                        View tmpChild2 = ((LinearLayout) tmpChild1).getChildAt(iLoop2);
                        if (tmpChild2 instanceof RadioButton) {
                            ((RadioButton) tmpChild2).setOnClickListener(new RadioButton.OnClickListener() {
                                public void onClick(View v) {
                                    MyMethod_ClickRadio(v, dialog);
                                }
                            });
                        }
                    }
                }
            }

            Button dialogButton = (Button)dialog.findViewById(R.id.LinLayout_Save);
            dialogButton.setOnClickListener(new Button.OnClickListener() {
                public void onClick(View v) {
                    dialog.dismiss();
                }
            });
        }
       dialog.show();
}


public void MyMethod_ClickRadio(View vRadio, final Dialog dDialog) {

        final LinearLayout tmpLayMain = (LinearLayout)dDialog.findViewById(R.id.LinLayout_Main);
        if (tmpLayMain!=null) {
            int iChildCount1 = tmpLayMain.getChildCount();
            for (int iLoop1=0; iLoop1 < iChildCount1; iLoop1++){
                View tmpChild1 = tmpLayMain.getChildAt(iLoop1);
                if (tmpChild1 instanceof LinearLayout) {
                    int iChildCount2 = ((LinearLayout) tmpChild1).getChildCount();
                    for (int iLoop2=0; iLoop2 < iChildCount2; iLoop2++){
                        View tmpChild2 = ((LinearLayout) tmpChild1).getChildAt(iLoop2);
                        if (tmpChild2 instanceof RadioButton) {
                            ((RadioButton) tmpChild2).setChecked(false);
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        ((RadioButton) vRadio).setChecked(true);
}

There maybe bugs, copied from project and renamed Voids/XML/ID

You can also run the same type of loop to find out which items are checked

share|improve this answer
    
Were you able to get this to work. I'm trying to create a radiogroup with sub-linearlayouts that have a radio button next to a regular button. I couldn't get it to work and posted, but was told that radiogroup will crash on any children that are not radiobuttons. –  abalter May 31 at 20:15

I created these two methods to solve this problem. All you have to do is pass the ViewGroup where the RadioButtons are (could be a RadioGroup, LinearLayout, RelativeLayout, etc.) and it sets the OnClick events exclusively, that is, whenever one of the RadioButtons that is a child of the ViewGroup (at any nested level) is selected, the others are unselected. It works with as many nested layouts as you would like.

public class Utils {
    public static void setRadioExclusiveClick(ViewGroup parent) {
        final List<RadioButton> radios = getRadioButtons(parent);

        for (RadioButton radio: radios) {
            radio.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {

                @Override
                public void onClick(View v) {
                    RadioButton r = (RadioButton) v;
                    r.setChecked(true);
                    for (RadioButton r2:radios) {
                        if (r2.getId() != r.getId()) {
                            r2.setChecked(false);
                        }
                    }

                }
            });
        }
    }

    private static List<RadioButton> getRadioButtons(ViewGroup parent) {
        List<RadioButton> radios = new ArrayList<RadioButton>();
        for (int i=0;i < parent.getChildCount(); i++) {
            View v = parent.getChildAt(i);
            if (v instanceof RadioButton) {
                radios.add((RadioButton) v);
            } else if (v instanceof ViewGroup) {
                List<RadioButton> nestedRadios = getRadioButtons((ViewGroup) v);
                radios.addAll(nestedRadios);
            }
        }
        return radios;
    }
}

Usage inside an activity would be like this:

ViewGroup parent = findViewById(R.id.radios_parent);
Utils.setRadioExclusiveClick(parent);
share|improve this answer

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