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I have this problem Symbol 'A' could not be resolved in file B.h , I'm using Eclipse IDE for C/C++ Developers:

//B.h file

#ifndef __B_H__
#define __B_H__

#include "A.h"



class B:  public cs::A{

};

#endif

that include A.h file:

//A.h file

#ifndef A_H_
#define A_H_
namespace cs{
class A {


};
}

#endif

What I'm missing here ?

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3 Answers 3

You placed the class A inside a namespace, you should keep the namespace resolution while using it:

class B:  public cs::A{

};

Or

//B.h file

#ifndef __B_H__
#define __B_H__

#include "A.h"

using namespace cs;

class B:  public A{

};

#endif

Which isn't recommended (check Als's comment).

Also you can do this to avoid both keeping the whole namespace qualification every time you use A (which you should do in the first solution), and using all the namespace:

//B.h file

#ifndef __B_H__
#define __B_H__

#include "A.h"

using cs::A;

class B:  public A{

};

#endif
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3  
using namespace cs; is definitely an overkill and should be avoided especially in an header file.It imports all the symbols in the namespace cs in each translation unit where the header file will be included. –  Alok Save May 5 '12 at 10:42
    
@Als: I agree with you, that's why I said I don't recommend it. However, I managed to view it and then unrecommend it to notify about the badness of that :) –  Tamer Shlash May 5 '12 at 10:45
    
I did add using namespace cs; and I got Symbol 'cs' could not be resolved, when I used class B: public cs::A{}; I got "Symbol 'A' could not be resolved" ?! –  nabil May 5 '12 at 10:57
    
@nabil: You missed a semicolon, check the added part of the answer. –  Tamer Shlash May 5 '12 at 10:59
1  
I just want to point out that namespaces don't have to end with a semicolon. In fact, my compiler complains when you do put one there due to the pedantic flag. –  chris May 5 '12 at 11:57
class B: public cs::A{ };
                ^^^^^^ 

You need to provide the fully qualified name of class A.

Note that the class A is defined inside the namespace cs and hence you cannot just use A without namespace qualification.

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it does not solve the problem, Symbol 'A' could not be resolved ! –  nabil May 5 '12 at 11:13

You are using namespace cs, remember to use that again when declaring class B.

//B.h file

#ifndef __B_H__
#define __B_H__

#include "A.h"


class B:  public cs::A{

};

#endif
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