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In case of static method overriding ..I have developed this below code

class Ab {  
    static void getF() {
        System.out.println("I am saral");
    }
}

class Ham extends Ab {
    static void getF() {
        System.out.println("I am saral saxena");
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // Ham h = new Ham();
        // h.getF(); //Ham
        Ab a = new Ham();
        a.getF(); // Ab class
    }
}

Now my query is that in case of static method overriding when i am using polymorphic behavior, Ab a = new Ham(); at this stage I am still getting the method getF(); of class Ab, please advise.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't override a static method.

Static methods belong to classes. You can call Ab.getF() or Ham.getF() - you chose which when you code.

Naming static methods the same in a class hierarchy has no impact whatsoever (other than possible confusion for programmers). Static methods are floating bits of code that belong to classes, not instances. Only instance methods are sensitive to overriding.

For this reason, it is poor style to call a static method on an instance (as you have), because it makes the method appear to be an instance method. It's allowed in the language, but leads to programmer confusion, and therefore bugs, especially if the static method has a name like an instance method - eg discovering that a method named setName(String) was a static method could be grounds for justifiable homicide.

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@Bohemian..yeah that the concept is static methods are hidden not overridden –  user1370546 May 5 '12 at 11:37
1  
No - they're not hidden (or shadowed as it's called). There is no such concept with static methods. –  Bohemian May 5 '12 at 11:39
    
Thanks, Could you please explain it in detail. –  user1370546 May 5 '12 at 11:40
    
You declared your a as being of class Ab. When you call a static method on a, it calls that of the class, that is, Ab. Try and cast the variable like: Ham other = (Ham)a; and then call other.getF();. By the way, better variable naming woudln't hurt for example explanations ;) –  Miquel May 5 '12 at 11:45
    
See edited answer for more explanation –  Bohemian May 5 '12 at 11:49

At compile time, static methods that are called by the instance are compiled as called with the class that the variable was declared as, not the actual instantiated class, so a.getF(); will result is Ab.getF(); and not Ham.getF();.

It is a very bad practice invoking static methods with the instance instead of the class name in general. (I think the best example is the call to Thread.sleep() on a thread instance, assuming it will cause the instance thread to sleep, but actually the current thread will)

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It is impossible and useless to override static functions (I am avoid the term method because method relates to an object).

When there is the need to call different static functions depending on the class of the object, do it this way

class Ab {  
 private static void getF() {
    System.out.println("I am saral");
 }
 public void doit () {
   getF ();
 }
}
class Ham extends Ab {
 private static void getF() {
    System.out.println("I am saral saxena");
 }
 @Override
 public void doit ()
 {
    getF ();
 }
 public static void main(String[] args) {
    Ab a = new Ham();
    a.doit(); // Ham class
}

}

By the way, using get for a function return void is strange

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The first thing is you can't call a situation where a static method with a name and signature in the derived class is same as in base class a case of overriding.

This is because in case of overriding the compiler does not generate the byte code for the function call as which actual method would be called is resolved at run time depending on the polymorphic behaviour of the reference variable.

Overriding is actually defined by such a dynamic behaviour of the compiler( and not by base class and subclass having a same signatured method, these are just preconditions for overriding).

Static methods are class entities and are thus bound to reference variables rather than run time objects and thus method call is resolved at compile time only(based on the type of reference variable, or class name if referred by it.

Similarly if you have public instance variables or static variables with the same name and type in both super and sub class the one with the type of variable would be chosen instead of the run time object.

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