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I have been read location.href is faster than window.location.href. But internally location.href is being read as window.location.href right? So how it would increase the significant performance?

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Do you really have performance problem on this topic ? I don't think so. I you really think you have, use Chrome's profiler to check. –  Denys Séguret May 5 '12 at 11:58
    
I think u could have read High performance javascript book before downvoting it –  Al. May 5 '12 at 12:42
    
I wasn't the one downloading. But really, look for your real performance problems before losing your time on (implementation dependant) details. –  Denys Séguret May 5 '12 at 12:51
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@dystroy: I don't read the question that way. I read it as: People say this would be faster, but why would it be faster? E.g., wanting to understand the underlying mechanism, rather than actually being worried about the performance. –  T.J. Crowder May 5 '12 at 12:55
    
"significant performance"... –  Denys Séguret May 5 '12 at 13:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I have been read location.href is faster than window.location.href.

It might be infinitessimally faster, but nothing you'd notice in real life. Here's why:

Here's what the engine does (in theory) when it sees location.href:

  • Looks up location in the current scope; if not found, goes to the containing scope and so on, eventually reaching global scope.
  • At global scope, location is found as a property of the global object.
  • Then it looks up the href property on the location object.

Here's what the engine does (in theory) when it sees window.location.href:

  • Looks up window in the current scope; if not found, goes to the containing scope and so on, eventually reaching global scope.
  • At global scope, window is found as a property of the global object; it's a property the global object uses to refer to itself.
  • Then it looks up the location property on that object.
  • Then it looks up the href property on the location object.

So window.location.href requires one more property lookup than location.href does — barring any optimizations the JavaScript engine might be able to apply. But JavaScript performance is incredibly variable from engine to engine; your mileage may vary. Here's a benchmark that FB55 put together showing that the theory above is borne out by experimental results; location.href is indeed faster. In that particular test.

Gratuitous benchmark screenshot

(Blue = location.href, red = window.location.href; longer lines = faster performance.)

More to the point: Does it really matter? Not in the real world, no. You'd have to be doing this millions of times for there to be any human-perceptible difference. But that's the explanation for why you'll see people saying this about globals like location (or any other global, built-in or added by your own code).

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Edited your question, I hope you don't mind :) –  Florian Margaine May 5 '12 at 12:04
    
@FlorianMargaine: (My answer, you mean.) Actually, I did, because you overwrote my rather more useful edit. If I'd wanted to say teeny tiny etc., I'd've done so. :-) –  T.J. Crowder May 5 '12 at 12:05

document.location is deprecated in favor of window.location, which can be accessed by just location, since it's a global object.

The location object has multiple properties and methods. If you try to use it as a string then it acts like location.href. To be on the safe side it's best to always use location.href

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Some thoughts on this:

  • In browsers, window is the global object, so all properties assigned to it can be accessed without referencing it. In both cases, the variables need to be searched in every surrounding scope (read: even the window object needs to be searched).
  • To avoid expensive searching, most modern browsers implemented a technique called "Inline Caching" (IC). Simplified, that means you're always pointing to the right object.

Anyway, I created a simple benchmark. Apparently, the direct access is faster (at least in Chrome).

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+1 for the benchmark. –  T.J. Crowder May 5 '12 at 12:12

In a first look they do the same thing, they could have different behaviour in case you are using frames.

In that case they could return different values, probably having some performance difference according to your frame-nesting complexity, but ignoring the frame stuff, they sould do the same thing in the same time.

Please specify where did you read about this.

HTH

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