Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a UITextField that users will be entering characters into. It is as simple as, how can I return it's actual length? When the string contains A-Z 1-9 characters it works as expected but any emoji or special characters get double counted.

In it's simplest format, this just has an allocation of 2 characters for some special characters like emoji:

NSLog(@"Field '%@' contains %i chars", myTextBox.text, [myTextBox.text length] );

I have tried looping through each character using characterAtIndex, substringFromIndex, etc. and got nowhere.

As per answer below, exact code used to count characters (hope this is the right approach but it works..):

NSString *sString = txtBox.text;

__block int length = 0;
[sString enumerateSubstringsInRange:NSMakeRange(0, [sString length]) 
                        options:NSStringEnumerationByComposedCharacterSequences
                        usingBlock:^(NSString *substring, NSRange substringRange, NSRange enclosingRange, BOOL *stop) {

                            length++;                                
                        }];

NSLog(@"Total: %u", length );
share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The [myTextBox.text length] returns the count of unichars and not the visible length of the string. é = e+´ which is 2 unichars. The Emoji characters should contain more the 1 unichar.

This sample below enumerates through each character block in the string. Which means if you log the range of substringRange it can longer than 1.

__block NSInteger length = 0;
[string enumerateSubstringsInRange:range
                           options:NSStringEnumerationByComposedCharacterSequences
                        usingBlock:^(NSString *substring, NSRange substringRange, NSRange enclosingRange, BOOL *stop) {
    length++;
}];

You should go and watch the Session 128 - Advance Text Processing from 2011 WWDC. They explain why it is like that. It's really great!

I hope this was to any help.
Cheers!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very very much. After some tweaking got it to work! Have updated above and accepted as answer (let me know if I've done anything wrong!). Will add that video to my watch list, have a few things I really need to polish up on... Thanks again –  Ralphonzo May 5 '12 at 13:55
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.