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I'm new to python but I've run into a hitch when trying to implement a variation of the observer pattern.

class X(models.Model):
    a = models.ForeignKey(Voter)
    b = models.CharField(max_length=200)

    # Register 
    Y.register(X)

This doesn't seem to work because it says X is not defined. A couple of things are possible:

A) There is a way to refer to the current class (not the instance, but the class object).

B) You can't even run code outside a method. (I thought this may work almost like a static constructor - it would just get run once).

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Are you really intending to pass in the class here? Instances I would understand, but the class? Unless register registers factories, but then you have a component registry, and that's not exactly observer pattern. In an observer pattern Y would notify X of things, which you can't do when X is a class. –  Lennart Regebro Jun 25 '09 at 21:31
    
What's Y? Another class? Not an object? Why aren't you using object instances for this? Why are you trying to use classes for this? –  S.Lott Jun 25 '09 at 21:50
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is nothing wrong with running (limited) code in the class definition:

class X(object):
  print("Loading X")

However, you can not refer to X because it is not yet fully defined.

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Makes sense. Thanks –  Daniel Jun 25 '09 at 21:00
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In python, code defined in a class block is executed and only then, depending on various things---like what has been defined in this block---a class is created. So if you want to relate one class with another, you'd write:

class X(models.Model):
    a = models.ForeignKey(Voter)
    b = models.CharField(max_length=200)

# Register 
Y.register(X)

And this behaviour is not related to django.

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