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I was wondering if

synchronize (lock) {
    ... 
}

Where lock is an instance of java.util.concurrent.locks.Lock, treats lock like any other object or as the try-finally idiom i.e.

 lock.lock(); 
 try {
     ... 
 } finally { 
    lock.unlock();
 }
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3 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Lock documentation:

Note that Lock instances are just normal objects and can themselves be used as the target in a synchronized statement. Acquiring the monitor lock of a Lock instance has no specified relationship with invoking any of the lock() methods of that instance. It is recommended that to avoid confusion you never use Lock instances in this way, except within their own implementation.

So basically, it's treated as any other object. And, don't do that.

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why "Don't do that"? –  hhafez Jun 25 '09 at 21:07
2  
@hhafez: "Don't do that" because the documentation says "It is recommended that to avoid confusion you never use Lock instances in this way, except within their own implementation." –  Grant Wagner Jun 25 '09 at 21:12
3  
FindBugs will find this bug. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jun 25 '09 at 21:13
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It will treat the lock just like any other object.

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The lock statement in the C# programming language can be applied to restrict access to a specific part of code to only one thread at a time.

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This is a Java question, not a C# question. (I did not vote down.) –  Peter O. Nov 22 '11 at 19:11
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