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Find patients who visited two different doctors of the same specialty in the same day.

Example database: Click here to view the sample data script in SQL Fiddle.

CREATE VIEW DistinctVisits AS
SELECT v.vid,v.pid,d.speciality,v.date
FROM Visits v ,Doctors d
WHERE d.did=v.did
GROUP BY v.pid,v.did,v.date;

CREATE VIEW DistinctVisits2 AS
SELECT dv.pid,dv.speciality,dv.date, COUNT(dv.vid) as countv
FROM DistinctVisits dv
GROUP BY dv.pid,dv.speciality,dv.date;

SELECT dv2.pid,dv2.speciality
FROM DistinctVisits2 dv2
WHERE dv2.countv=2;

DROP VIEW DistinctVisits;
DROP VIEW DistinctVisits2;

how do i repeat the same idea but on just one big query? another solutions would be nice as well, but try to help me improve this one first.

share|improve this question
    
I assume this is an assignment? Odd thing is I'm pretty certain I remember assisting with this very same problem several months ago. I wonder if someone else took the same univ course... –  Michael Berkowski May 5 '12 at 13:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Explanation:

  • You need to find the list of patients who had visited two different doctors of the same speciality on a given day.

  • In this requirement, your Patient table becomes the main table. Let's query that table first.

  • Now we have the list of patients. We need to get the list of doctors they visited. We cannot simply join the Patients table with Doctors table because there is no column to map the data. We have to use Visits as the intermediate table

  • Add a LEFT OUTER JOIN between Patient and Visits table and join by pid column.

  • We have the patients and the list of their visits but now we need to get the doctors information. So, Add another LEFT OUTER JOIN between Visits and Doctors table and join by did column.

  • We have the patients and doctor visits information. However, we need only the patient's name, the speciality of the doctor they visited and the date when they visited. So, we will add the columns p.pname, d.speciality and v.date to the SELECT clause and also in the GROUP BY clause. In addition to this we, need all the visits count but there is a catch. We need only the DISTINCT count, in other words we need the count of all the unique doctors that they visited. So, if the patient visited the same doctor twice on a give day, it should be counted as 1. So, adding DISTINCT will help here. Also, the key is to use the correct column name, in this case d.did represents the doctor.

  • We have all the data we need but we need filter only the patients who visited two different doctors on the same day. To do that, HAVING clause comes to our rescue. HAVING is appropriate when you apply GROUP BY. We will use the same COUNT(DISTINCT d.did) to check if the count matches only the value of 2. You can see the results in the output.

Suggestion:

  • You don't have to specify the INSERT INTO statement for every value being inserted into a table. You can group them together within parentheses and separate them by commas. The last statement should end with semicolon.

  • The query uses LEFT OUTER JOIN. I used this join to find out all the doctor visits for each patient even if they had never visited a doctor. I just wanted to see the output as I formed the query. You could change this to INNER JOIN, which I think is more appropriate in your scenario.

  • If you don't want to display the visits count, you can remove it from the SELECT clause.

Demo:

Click here to view the demo in SQL Fiddle.

Script used in explanation:

SELECT          p.pname
            ,   d.speciality 
            ,   v.date
            ,   COUNT(DISTINCT d.did) AS visitcount
FROM            Patient p
LEFT OUTER JOIN Visits v
ON              v.pid = p.pid
LEFT OUTER JOIN Doctors d
ON              d.did = v.did
GROUP BY        p.pname
            ,   d.speciality
            ,   v.date
HAVING          COUNT(DISTINCT d.did) = 2

More appropriate script for you:

SELECT      p.pname
        ,   d.speciality 
        ,   v.date
FROM        Patient p
INNER JOIN Visits v
ON          v.pid = p.pid
INNER JOIN Doctors d
ON          d.did = v.did
GROUP BY    p.pname
        ,   d.speciality
        ,   v.date
HAVING      COUNT(DISTINCT d.did) = 2

Output:

PNAME      SPECIALITY    DATE       VISITCOUNT
---------  ------------  ---------  -----------
Loch Ness  Assholes      17/9/2012      2
Loch Ness  Orthopedist   13/1/2011      2

Create table and insert script:

create table InsuranceCompanies  (
    cid         int,
    cname       varchar(20),
    primary key (cid)
);

create table Patient (
    pid         int,
    pname       varchar(20),
    age         int,
    cid         int,
    gender      char,
    primary     key (pid),
    constraint foreign key (cid) 
        references InsuranceCompanies (cid) 
);

create table Doctors (
    did         int ,
    dname       varchar(20),
    speciality  varchar(20),
    age         int,
    cid         int,
    primary key (did),
    constraint foreign key (cid) 
        references InsuranceCompanies (cid) 
);

create table Visits(
    vid         int,
    pid         int,
    did         int,
    date        varchar(20),
    primary key (vid),
    constraint foreign key (pid) 
        references Patient (pid) ,
    constraint foreign key (did) 
        references Doctors (did)
);

INSERT INTO InsuranceCompanies(cid, cname) VALUES
    ( 1111, 'Harel Inc' ),
    ( 2222, 'Clalit Inc' );

INSERT INTO Doctors ( did, dname, speciality, age, cid) VALUES 
    ( 100, 'Jhonny Depp',       'Heart',        42, 1111 ),
    ( 101, 'Tom Tolan',         'Assholes',     62, 1111 ),
    ( 105, 'Yom Tov',           'Assholes',     52, 1111 ),
    ( 102, 'Lauren Jaime',      'Throat',       27, 2222 ),
    ( 103, 'Gomez Flaurence',   'Legs',         37, 2222 ),
    ( 106, 'David Harpaz',      'Orthopedist',  37, 2222 ),
    ( 107, 'David Schwimmer',   'Orthopedist',  37, 2222 ),
    ( 108, 'Sammy Salut',       'Orthopedist',  37, 1111 );

INSERT INTO Patient ( pid, pname, age, cid,gender) VALUES 
    ( 200, 'Jon Gilmour',       25, 2222, 'm' ),
    ( 206, 'Bon Gilmour',       30, 2222, 'm' ),
    ( 205, 'Jon Gilmour',       22, 2222, 'm' ),
    ( 201, 'Bon Jovy',          21, 2222, 'm' ),
    ( 202, 'Loch Ness',         17, 2222, 'f' ),
    ( 203, 'Lilach Sonin',      12, 1111, 'f' ),
    ( 209, 'Lilach Dba',        34, 1111, 'f' ),
    ( 210, 'Paulina Daf',       32, 1111, 'f' ),
    ( 204, 'Gerry Jalor',       23, 1111, 'm' ),
    ( 208, 'Jerrushalem Jalor', 23, 1111, 'm' );

INSERT INTO Visits ( vid, pid, did, date) VALUES 
    ( 300, 204, 100,    '12/12/2012' ),
    ( 301, 204, 101,    '12/12/2012' ),
    ( 302, 204, 101,    '02/01/2012' ),
    ( 303, 202, 101,    '17/09/2012' ),
    ( 311, 202, 105,    '17/09/2012' ),
    ( 304, 203, 102,    '12/12/2011' ),
    ( 312, 202, 106,    '13/06/2012' ),
    ( 314, 202, 107,    '13/01/2011' ),
    ( 313, 202, 108,    '13/01/2011' ),
    ( 305, 204, 102,    '10/10/2011' ),
    ( 306, 201, 100,    '12/01/2012' ),
    ( 316, 204, 108,    '18/05/2012' ),
    ( 307, 202, 100,    '12/07/2012' ),
    ( 315, 203, 108,    '12/07/2012' ),
    ( 310, 204, 103,    '10/04/2012' ),
    ( 308, 203, 102,    '12/12/2011' ),
    ( 309, 200, 101,    '12/12/2012' );
share|improve this answer
    
youre good at what you do! –  Ofek Ron May 5 '12 at 13:57
    
very detailed and accurate answer, and thank you for the insertion suggestion, youre great! couple of wonderings: why did u use left outer join instead of another kind of join? and actually, i think the Count feild can be disregarded in the select cant it? –  Ofek Ron May 5 '12 at 14:05
    
IMHO the LEFT OUTER joins don't make much sense; the pid is a primary key for the patients table. A plain JOIN would suffice. Similar for docters and visits. –  wildplasser May 5 '12 at 14:06
    
The COUNT() will never be nonzero for the outer matches. –  wildplasser May 5 '12 at 14:10
    
is the inner join same as join? –  Ofek Ron May 5 '12 at 14:16

What you need is a HAVING clause to find COUNT(*) = 2 after grouping by date and specialty. In fact, no nesting should even be necessary. (I have also replaced your implicit join by comma separated FROM clause with an explicit JOIN, which is the more preferred modern syntax).

SELECT 
  v.pid,
  d.speciality,
  v.date,
  COUNT(COUNT DISTINCT d.did) AS numvisits
FROM 
  visits v
  JOIN Doctors d ON v.did = d.did
GROUP BY v.pid, d.speciality, v.date
HAVING COUNT(COUNT DISTINCT d.did) = 2
/* Note - depending on your RDBMS, you may
   be able to use the count alias as
HAVING numvisits = 2 
   MySQL allows this, for ex, but MS SQL Server doesn't and I think Oracle doesn't */

The SELECT list here and GROUP BY should produce the patient id, specialty, date, and the number of visits for the aggregate combination of those 3 columns. The HAVING clause then limits it to only those with 2 visits for the group.

To pull only the patients from this, wrap it in a subquery:

SELECT Patients.* 
FROM Patients JOIN (
  SELECT 
    v.pid,
    d.speciality,
    v.date,
    COUNT(COUNT DISTINCT d.did) AS numvisits
  FROM 
    visits v
    JOIN Doctors d ON v.did = d.did
  GROUP BY v.pid, d.speciality, v.date
  HAVING COUNT(COUNT DISTINCT d.did) = 2
) subq ON Patients.pid = subq.pid
share|improve this answer
    
it doesnt do, try it on fiddle you get diffrent results then my query... you must be missing something –  Ofek Ron May 5 '12 at 13:14
    
btw you are missing an i in speciality –  Ofek Ron May 5 '12 at 13:17
    
@OfekRon Yes, changed to COUNT(DISTINCT d.did) –  Michael Berkowski May 5 '12 at 13:22
1  
@OfekRon btw, specialty is the accepted American spelling, without the other i, in my defense. –  Michael Berkowski May 5 '12 at 13:23
    
O/T: I think both words are valid. In the UK, a doctor would have a specialty area of expertise, whilst a chef has a speciality of the day. Getting them the other way around sounds wrong in both cases, imo. –  halfer May 5 '12 at 15:02

A bit late after Siva's answer, but here's my query:

SELECT v.pid, d.speciality, count(DISTINCT d.did) as cnt
  FROM Visits v
  JOIN Doctors d ON v.did = d.did
 GROUP BY v.pid, d.speciality, v.date
HAVING count(DISTINCT d.did) = 2;

It produces exactly the same output as the initial OP's query without views.

share|improve this answer
WITH
dv1 as
(
    SELECT v.vid, v.pid, d.speciality, v.date
    FROM Visits v, Doctors d
    WHERE d.did=v.did
    GROUP BY v.pid,v.did,v.date;
),
dv2 as
(
    SELECT dv.pid,dv.speciality,dv.date, COUNT(dv.vid) as countv
    FROM dv1
    GROUP BY dv.pid,dv.speciality,dv.date;
)
SELECT dv2.pid, dv2.speciality
FROM dv2
WHERE dv2.countv=2;
share|improve this answer
    
MySQL doesn't support CTEs and question is marked for MySQL. –  vyegorov May 5 '12 at 13:45
    
hum... twas SQL when i saw it :) –  EvilTeach May 5 '12 at 17:39
    
Yes, it was changed by the OP. Sorry for the noise... –  vyegorov May 5 '12 at 17:40
    
np. I debated removing mine, because your answer was so very correct, but the nature of the question suggested that the ops background wasen't very strong. The thing I presented is a incremental step, and possibly more understandable stepping stone. So I left it. –  EvilTeach May 5 '12 at 18:26
    
Sure. It's tough without CTEs and window functions in fact... –  vyegorov May 5 '12 at 18:28

You can use a nested CTE (if you are not on mysql, that is...) A CTE can be seen as an immediate view, which only exists for the duration of the statement. (NOTE: untested)

WITH DistinctVisits2 AS (
    WITH DistinctVisits AS (
        SELECT v.vid,v.pid,d.speciality,v.date
        FROM Visits v
        JOIN Doctors d ON d.did=v.did
        GROUP BY v.pid,v.did,v.date
        )
    SELECT dv.pid,dv.speciality,dv.date, COUNT(dv.vid) as countv
    FROM DistinctVisits dv
    GROUP BY dv.pid,dv.speciality,dv.date
    )
SELECT dv2.pid,dv2.speciality
FROM DistinctVisits2 dv2
WHERE dv2.countv=2
    ;
share|improve this answer
    
MySQL doesn't support CTEs and question is marked for MySQL. –  vyegorov May 5 '12 at 13:44
    
The mysql tag was added later. Check the revision history. –  wildplasser May 5 '12 at 13:57
    
My bad, sorry for the noise. –  vyegorov May 5 '12 at 13:58

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