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While going through the source for Remy Sharp's demo of Simple Drag and Drop, I found this function:

function entities(s) {
  var e = {
    '"' : '"',
    '&' : '&',
    '<' : '<',
    '>' : '>'
  };
  return s.replace(/["&<>]/g, function (m) {
    return e[m];
  });
}

From what I see, it just replaces " or & or < or > with itself. So there is no need for that function.

How am I wrong?

UPDATE: Source can be viewed by clicking 'View Source' at the end of the page.

share|improve this question
    
How is the source being viewed? As-is it does nothing, bit if it was viewed in something that rendered the entities, it would only look like it didn't do anything because the HTML entities used as character replacements would render as the character, not the HTML entity equivalent. – Dave Newton May 5 '12 at 14:13
    
He clicked the "view source" link at the bottom of the page (which exhibits a misbehavior rendering special ampersand-notated characters), rather than with a browser-level source viewing tool. – apsillers May 5 '12 at 14:22
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I looked the source of the page in Chrome with Ctrl+U, and this is what I found:

function entities(s) {
  var e = {
    '"' : '&quot;',
    '&' : '&amp;',
    '<' : '&lt;',
    '>' : '&gt;'
  };
  return s.replace(/["&<>]/g, function (m) {
    return e[m];
  });
}

This, obviously, does something -- namely, it replaces special characters with an escaped form.

The reason that you saw what you did is that the source you're viewing on the "view source" page is being rendered in HTML. Thus, when the source's &quot; string is rendered on the "view source" page, it shows up on the HTML page as ". HTML5Deoms really should escape the ampersands on their view-source pages like &amp;quot; so that it will show up on rendered source page correctly as &quot;, but they don't do that.

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Sorry. It was my mistake when I blindly relied on viewing source in html that they provided instead of going with 'view-source' option. Thanks a lot :) – sv_in May 5 '12 at 14:45

I don't know where you've seen it (I can't find it in the site you gave), but you've probably misread the function or read it after some sort of parsing by the browser.

The function most likely replcaes < with &gt; and & with &amp;. Because you've seen it through a browser, the browser replaced the entities back to original characters, resulting in < : < etc.

If this is indeed the original function and there's no mistake, this function does nothing.

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You're right. This function does nothing.

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I looked at the source and it says this:

function entities(s) {
  var e = {
    '"' : '&quot;',
    '&' : '&amp;',
    '<' : '&lt;',
    '>' : '&gt;'
  };

It's escaping special characters so the HTML tags and source can be seen and not interpreted as HTML.

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I don't know where you've found that function, but I guess Truth is right. this is what I found

    function entities(s) {
  var e = {
    '"' : '&quot;',
    '&' : '&amp;',
    '<' : '&lt;',
    '>' : '&gt;'
  };
  return s.replace(/["&<>]/g, function (m) {
    return e[m];
  });
}
share|improve this answer

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