Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following DataTemplate :

<DataTemplate>

<Grid>
<1-- Content -->
</Grid>

</DataTempalte>

I want to place an adorner on top of the content of the Grid.

How can I do that?

The adorner I want to use is another Grid.

Can we do this in pure XAML only?

Thanks

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

I have made very good experience with the following code:

http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/54472/Defining-WPF-Adorners-in-XAML

After adding some classes to your code base you are able to define Adorners in Xaml like so:

<local:AdornedControl x:Name="adornedControl" HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center"
    HorizontalAdornerPlacement="Outside" VerticalAdornerPlacement="Outside" IsAdornerVisible="True"
        IsMouseOverShowEnabled="False">
<local:AdornedControl.AdornerContent>
    <Canvas x:Name="adornerCanvas" HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center">
        <Thumb Canvas.Top="-5" Canvas.Left="-5" />
        <Thumb Canvas.Bottom="-5" Canvas.Left="-5" />
        <Thumb Canvas.Top="-5" Canvas.Right="-5" />
        <Thumb Canvas.Bottom="-5" Canvas.Right="-5" />
    </Canvas>
</local:AdornedControl.AdornerContent>
share|improve this answer
add comment

No, WPF Adorners must be implemented in code as you'll see on MSDN.

If you can't create an Andorner in code, you might consider just layering the XAML you wanted in the DataTemplate directly. Additionally, as Adorners use DrawingContext for rendering, you'll find using a Grid won't be practical either.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you mean that if a grid's dimensions are undefined using a DrawingContext will not work as it needs coordinates to work with, right ? –  Aybe Oct 27 '13 at 16:57
    
Yes, that's right. –  WiredPrairie Oct 27 '13 at 19:32
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.