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Is there a way to perform one code if either of two things happen? Specifically, I have 2 TextFields, and if any of them is empty, I want to popup UIAlertView when action is performed. I can set

if ([myTextField.text length] == 0) {
    NSLog(@"Nothing There");
    UIAlertView *nothing = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"Incomplete" message:@"Please fill out all fields before recording" delegate:self cancelButtonTitle:@"Ok" otherButtonTitles: nil];
    [nothing show];
    [nothing release];
}
if ([yourTextField.text length] == 0) {
    NSLog(@"Nothing For Name");
    UIAlertView *nothing = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"Incomplete" message:@"Please fill out all fields before recording" delegate:self cancelButtonTitle:@"Ok" otherButtonTitles: nil];
    [nothing show];
    [nothing release];
}

but if both are empty, it will pop up the statement 2 times.

How can I get it to popup only once if either, or both are empty?

share|improve this question
    
Hey @AshBurlaczenko if you don't have anything to add, then do not comment. You're about to get flagged –  user717452 May 5 '12 at 15:07
2  
@AshBurlaczenko's comment is correct in this case. You're asking about THE MOST BASIC language syntax in Objective-C. A quick tutorial on Objective-C would probably help YOU, though feel free to ask questions about any confusion you may have here on SO. –  Yar May 5 '12 at 15:24
2  
@user717452, what reason would you give for flagging my comment? The answer is a very basic programming concept and although the syntax may differ for different languages, by knowing the basic you could easily have found the answer though google. I have never programmed in objective-c yet I knew the answer because I understand the basics. –  Ash Burlaczenko May 5 '12 at 15:44
    
It was flagged because it was non-constructive. –  user717452 May 5 '12 at 19:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can combine the two conditions into a single if statement using the || (or) operator.

if (([myTextField.text length] == 0) || ([yourTextField.text length] == 0)) {
    NSLog(@"Nothing There");
    UIAlertView *nothing = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"Incomplete" 
                                                      message:@"Please fill out all fields before recording" 
                                                     delegate:self 
                                            cancelButtonTitle:@"Ok" 
                                            otherButtonTitles:nil];
    [nothing show];
    [nothing release];
}
share|improve this answer

use compound condition

if (([myTextField.text length] == 0) || ([yourTextField.text length] == 0))) {
    NSLog(@"Nothing There");
    UIAlertView *nothing = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"Incomplete" message:@"Please fill out all fields before recording" delegate:self cancelButtonTitle:@"Ok" otherButtonTitles: nil];
    [nothing show];
    [nothing release];
}
share|improve this answer

As other answers point out, you can do an or with lazy evaluation like this:

if ([myTextField.text length] == 0 || [yourTextField.text length] == 0) {

the lazy evaluation (|| instead of |) just ensures that the second condition is only run if it has to be.

Note that these things evaluate to BOOL, so you can take advantage and give things names. For instance:

BOOL eitherFieldZeroLength = ([myTextField.text length] == 0 || [yourTextField.text length] == 0);
if (eitherFieldZeroLength) {

While this is trivial for the current case, using intermediate variables can add clarity to your code.

share|improve this answer
3  
The logical or || is not a lazy version of the bitwise or |, it just happens that they seem to work like that when you use them in the way you suggest. The logical or is comparing true and false values whereas they bitwise or is or'ing the individual bits together. –  mttrb May 5 '12 at 15:39
    
@mttrb I'll be glad to correct or delete my answer once I get this. What do you mean, though? These are not short-circuit evaluations? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short-circuit_evaluation Also, what do you mean that they "seem to work like that?" They do work like that, right? –  Yar May 5 '12 at 17:49

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