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for a class I have to use Java, jogl and lwjgl. We were given some code and now i am trying to run this code, however i get the error:

" GLSL 3.30 is not supported. Supported versions are: 1.00 ES, 1.10, and 1.20"

And i am unable to determine what shaders are supported or if it is a driver problem or a hardware shortcomming.

Currently I am on debian testing/unstable and use the current xorg-video-ati driver package.

Can anyone tell me how to identify which shaders (if at all) are supported?

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3 Answers 3

" GLSL 3.30 is not supported. Supported versions are: 1.00 ES, 1.10, and 1.20" (...) Currently I am on debian testing/unstable and use the current xorg-video-ati driver package.

Well, that's no big surprise as the DRI/Mesa xorg-video-ati aka radeon drivers support only OpenGL-2.1 with extensions so far. OpenGL-3 is still in the experimental stage of DRI/Mesa development.

You need to install AMD/ATI's propriatary fglrx/Catalyst drivers to get support for OpenGL-3 and above (of course this still depends on your hardware). Luckily the quality of fglrx improved dramatically and my last exhaustive tests (with a Radeon HD6570) they showed great stability (they survived even all the torture tests, like obscure context and FB settings). The only real bug I found and reported was that glXSwapBuffers would never block on a indirect rendering context no matter how V-sync and swap intervall were set.

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GLSL 3.30 requires OpenGL 3.3. It would appear that either your hardware can't run GL 3.x or you haven't updated your drivers recently enough.

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If you look in the GLSL files or the string being loaded as a shader, there should be a line:

#version 330

This means version 3.3. You can try changing that to:

#version 120

(Version 1.2)

There is no guarantee it will work but if the shaders are simple you might get away with it.

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