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I am new to python and is wondering if I can make a try-catch-else statement without handling the exception?

Like:

try:
    do_something()
except Exception:
else:
    print("Message: ", line) // complains about that else is not intended
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2 Answers 2

up vote 21 down vote accepted

The following sample code shows you how to catch and ignore an exception, using pass.

try:
    do_something()
except RuntimeError:
    pass # does nothing
else:
    print("Message: ", line) 
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Thanks! I will mark this answer as corrected in a few minutes (it is not possible for some minutes) –  Rox May 5 '12 at 17:11

While I agree that Jochen Ritzel's is a good answer, I think there may be a small oversight in it. By passing, the exception /is/ being handled, only nothing is done. So really, the exception is ignored.

If you really don't want to handle the exception, then the exception should be raised. The following code makes that change to Jochen's code.

try:
    do_something()
except RuntimeError:
    raise #raises the exact error that would have otherwise been raised.
else:
    print("Message: ", line) 
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3  
Isn't that exactly identical to do_something(); print("Message: ", line)? –  Kirk Strauser May 5 '12 at 17:38
    
@KirkStrauser yes, but explicit is better than implicit. Any user will see that an except is expected, and then raised to the caller, without having to look up whether do_something raises any exceptions. –  Darthfett May 5 '12 at 18:23
    
@Darthfett I think that's going overboard. If you think that an exception is likely to crop up, you should handle it properly (even if that's just printing a user-friendly message) otherwise, just leave it out. –  Lattyware May 5 '12 at 18:30
    
If it was me, do_something() wouldn't raise. I'd call do_something and then raise explicitly –  inspectorG4dget May 5 '12 at 18:47
    
Are you saying that if do_something() encounters an error internal to that function, you'd rather attempt to detect that outside of the function and then raise an exception, on its behalf, outside of the function call? That doesn't sound like a good idea. –  anregen Jul 10 at 19:26

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