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I was going through the advanced threads section that java offers regarding locks,I have developed the code..

// A simple lock example.
import java.util.concurrent.locks.*;

class LockDemo {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        ReentrantLock lock = new ReentrantLock();
        new LockThread(lock, "A");
        new LockThread(lock, "B");        
    }
}

// A shared resource.
class Shared {
    static int count = 0;
}

// A thread of execution that increments count.
class LockThread implements Runnable {
    String name;
    ReentrantLock lock;

    LockThread(ReentrantLock lk, String n) {
        lock = lk;
        name = n;       
        new Thread(this).start();
    }

    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Starting " + name);
        try {
            // First, lock count.
            System.out.println(name + " is waiting to lock count.");
            lock.lock();
            System.out.println(name + " is locking count.");
            Shared.count++;
            System.out.println(name + ": " + Shared.count);
            // Now, allow a context switch -- if possible.
            System.out.println(name + " is sleeping.");
            Thread.sleep(1000);
        } catch (InterruptedException exc) {
            System.out.println(exc);
        } finally {
            // Unlock
            System.out.println(name + " is unlocking count.");
            lock.unlock();
        }
    }
}

My query is that as we have seen above in class LockDemo that we are calling

new LockThread(lock, "A"); 
new LockThread(lock, "B");

can't it be expressed in simple and full terms in coding so that I can grasp more please advise how to express it more simple forms.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Matt Ball, GETah, JB Nizet, Luksprog, Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 5 '12 at 17:34

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
@MattBall..this new LockThread(lock, "A"); new LockThread(lock, "B"); sometimes become a little bit difficult to understand. – user1370546 May 5 '12 at 17:22
2  
If you don't understand what new LockThread(lock, "A"); does, then you're very very far from being ready to deal with multiple threads and concurrency, which are a hard and advanced topic. Learn the basics of the Java language first. new LockThread(lock, "A"); is just a call to a constructor. docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/constructors.html – JB Nizet May 5 '12 at 17:24
    
@JBNizet that I understand very well, But I use expanded form of coding – user1370546 May 5 '12 at 17:26
    
@user1375549: next time, please try indenting your code before posting it. We're all volunteers here and greatly appreciate it if you don't make it more difficult than it has to be to understand your code. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 5 '12 at 17:34
    
I've fixed the indentation and suggest a reopening. – Tudor May 5 '12 at 17:55
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It always pisses me off when I see threaded code like this. You are right, it's a bad example and what it does is not as obvious as it should be. The part that annoys me is the implementation of Runnable using itself to start a thread as well as the fact that it starts the thread inside the constructor.

I would rewrite it like this:

// A simple lock example.
import java.util.concurrent.locks.*;

class LockDemo {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        ReentrantLock lock = new ReentrantLock();
        LockThread lt1 = new LockThread(lock, "A");
        LockThread lt2 = new LockThread(lock, "B");
        Thread t1 = new Thread(lt1);
        Thread t2 = new Thread(lt2);
        t1.start();
        t2.start();
    }
}

// A shared resource.
class Shared {
    static int count = 0;
}

// A thread of execution that increments count.
class LockThread implements Runnable {
    String name;
    ReentrantLock lock;

    LockThread(ReentrantLock lk, String n) {
        lock = lk;
        name = n;       
    }

    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Starting " + name);
        try {
            // First, lock count.
            System.out.println(name + " is waiting to lock count.");
            lock.lock();
            System.out.println(name + " is locking count.");
            Shared.count++;
            System.out.println(name + ": " + Shared.count);
            // Now, allow a context switch -- if possible.
            System.out.println(name + " is sleeping.");
            Thread.sleep(1000);
        } catch (InterruptedException exc) {
            System.out.println(exc);
        } finally {
            // Unlock
            System.out.println(name + " is unlocking count.");
            lock.unlock();
        }
    }
}

Now it's much more clear from main that you are creating two thread tasks (objects whose class implements Runnable) and using them to start two threads.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, really you understand Man, thanks – user1370546 May 5 '12 at 17:32

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