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I am wondering if there is a way to select list items an incrimentally add a css value as the list goes on.

It is hard to explain so let me show and example:

<ul class="list">
<li></li>
<li></li>
<li></li>
<li></li>
....
</ul>

I would like to take a dynamically generated list like this and

<ul class="list">
    <li style="left:0px;"></li>
    <li style="left:10px;"></li>
    <li style="left:20px;"></li>
    <li style="left:30px;"></li>
    ....
</ul>

I'm not sure if this is best done with jQuery, or if there is a type of CSS selector I don't know about that could pull this off.

If I were to use jQuery, i think it might go something like this:

$('.list > li:nth-child(2)').css('left', '+=10px').next

But I am not sure how to scrub through the rest of the list and keep adding 10px every time. I've been playing the the idea of using '.next' and '.prev' but am unsure how to execute.

Thanks in advance for your patience, I'm a novice at jQuery.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can use each and the index parameter as a control. I used margin-left here for my example, but obviously just left will work in your case also.

http://jsfiddle.net/nEePk/

$('li').each( function(index) {
    $(this).css('margin-left', index * 10);
});​

As far as a CSS only means, I don't think this will be possible. The reason is that there is no math that can be done in the actual expression. You can certainly select each li using the immediate sibling selector though.

li ~ li { ... } 
share|improve this answer
    
Ooooo this is very cool! The jQuery website appears to be down, but I will read up on index, that looks awesome. Thanks so much for your help! –  patrick May 5 '12 at 17:45
    
nice edit! that's helpful to remember... but wouldn't that be the same as just selecting all of the list items the regular way? –  patrick May 5 '12 at 17:47
    
@patrick - yes it is basically the same, which is why it won't work =). You can do cool stuff with the adjacent sibling and immediate descendent combinators ~ and >. For example you could remove all double breaks with jQuery like so. $('br ~ br').remove() –  mrtsherman May 5 '12 at 18:00
    
Strange, I can't seem to get it to work with left. jsfiddle.net/nEePk/2 –  patrick May 5 '12 at 18:11
    
@patrick - you floated them so left wont work anymore –  mrtsherman May 5 '12 at 19:42

Could always do something like the following:

var left = 0;

$('.list > li').each(function() {
    $(this).css('left', left + 'px');
    left += 10;
});
share|improve this answer
    
this was actually a good solution too! thx! –  patrick May 5 '12 at 18:12

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