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I am wondering whether I can upgrade a basic IoC container I am using to support lazy load. So if I have registered IFoo, I would like the IoC container to know how to fulfil both of the following dependencies (the first being the standard way IoC containers work, while the second returns a simple delegate that calls into the container for an IFoo when it is invoked).

public Bar(IFoo x)

public Bar2(Func<IFoo> lazyFoo)

The problem comes when I try to write the code that will actually do this. Is there a syntax that will make the following pseudo-code compile?

public T Resolve<T>()
{
    if (T is Func<X>)
        return (T) () => Resolve(typeof(X));
    return (T)Resolve(typeof(T));
}

Or to put my question another way, if I have a type T, how can I detect if it is an instance of Func<X>, and if so, what is the type of X?

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Sajmon, Mike S., Jean-Bernard Pellerin, von v. May 7 '13 at 0:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

take a look at this question from this morning - might give you a good start - http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1043755/c-generic-list-t-how-to-get-the-type-of-t

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Indeed, replace List with Func and you're done... –  Marc Gravell Jun 25 '09 at 22:05
    
yes, looks like this will do it for me. thanks Now I have a problem that the compiler won't let me cast from () => Resolve(theArgumentType) back to the original T (even if I try to cast to object first). "Cannot convert lambda expression to type 'T' because it is not a delegate type" –  Mark Heath Jun 25 '09 at 22:13

I misunderstood your question.

It is impossible to do it in one function the way you're trying to because the compiler must have a delegate type to create the lambda as at compile time.

However, this should work.

public T Resolve<T>()
{
    return (T)Resolve(typeof(T));
}

public Func<T> LazyResolve<T>()
{
    return () => Resolve<T>();
}
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ok I think I understand why its not possible. Shame, because it would be a nice feature for an IoC container. –  Mark Heath Jun 26 '09 at 15:16

In answer to the question in the comment, you need to invoke the lambda expression, not cast it.

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I don't want to invoke it yet, I want to pass the Func itself back so that the caller can invoke it when they are ready to –  Mark Heath Jun 26 '09 at 5:52
    
Then you need to cast it to Func<T>. –  SLaks Jun 26 '09 at 12:13
    
I misunderstood; see second answer. –  SLaks Jun 26 '09 at 12:20

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