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I have this function (TRIM_REPLACE) that gets spaces from both the right and the left of a string. However, I am trying to modify it so that it trims in the middle also but I would rather combine the function than to do it separately.

Example: Let's say I have a name

Input
--------------------------
Peter<space><space>Griffin

<space> indicate one blank space in the above input.

I would like to trim the additional space in the so that it looks like this:

Output
--------------------------
Peter<space>Griffin

As you can see that the multiple spaces are replaced with a single space.

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.TRIM_REPLACE
(
    @STRING     VARCHAR(MAX)
)
RETURNS VARCHAR(MAX)
    BEGIN
        RETURN LTRIM(RTRIM(@STRING))  + REPLACE(@STRING, '  ',' ')  
    END
GO

How do I accomplish this?

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Might be time to go with CLR to gain acces to Regex. That way it is a single call. –  Frisbee May 5 '12 at 22:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you are only concerned about pairs of spaces, you can use . . .

ltrim(rtrim(replace(@String, '  ', ' ')))

If you might have multiple spaces, you need to put this into a loop:

while charindex('  ', @string) > 0
begin
    set @string = replace(@string, '  ', ' ');
end;
return ltrim(rtrim(@string));
share|improve this answer
    
Good answer, but I don't think you need to loop based on this documentation: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms186862.aspx. Looks like it does a global replace by default. –  Marc May 5 '12 at 18:07
    
Hello, I tested the above example, it seem the LOOP is need to move multiple spaces, Example: I added a work to the column: Peter------Griggin and without the Loop, it returns: Peter----Griggin, only one space is removed. Using the Loop returns: Peter-Griffin. –  Unaverage Guy May 5 '12 at 18:18
    
@Unaverage, Your comment is clear enough but I believe you meant "Griffin" in all cases (as opposed to "Griggin" in the first two and "Griffin" in the last) –  RonnBlack Sep 4 '14 at 18:36

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