Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using Ruby on Rails 3.2.2 and I would like to know if the following is a "proper"/"correct"/"sure" way to override a setter method for a my class attribute.

attr_accessible :attribute_name

def attribute_name=(value)
  ... # Some custom operation.

  self[:attribute_name] = value
end

The above code seems to work as expected. However, I would like to know if, by using the above code, in future I will have problems or, at least, what problems "should I expect"/"could happen" with Ruby on Rails. If that isn't the right way to override a setter method, what is the right way?


Note: If I use the code

attr_accessible :attribute_name

def attribute_name=(value)
  ... # Some custom operation.

  self.attribute_name = value
end

I get the following error:

SystemStackError (stack level too deep):
  actionpack (3.2.2) lib/action_dispatch/middleware/reloader.rb:70
share|improve this question
2  
I love the terminology applied '"proper"/"correct"/"sure"'. When you give it 3 ways it really ensures there is no misinterpretation. Good Job! –  Jay May 8 '12 at 18:54
5  
@Jay - "Fineness italianisms" ; - ) –  Backo May 8 '12 at 18:57
1  
Just to be clear, the "stack level too deep" is referring to the fact that its a recursive call ... its calling itself. –  Nippysaurus Jan 29 '14 at 5:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 134 down vote accepted

If you want to override the setter methods for columns of a table while accessing through models, this is the way to do it.

class Model < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :attribute_name

  def attribute_name=(value)
    # custom actions
    ###
    write_attribute(:attribute_name, value)
    # this is same as self[:attribute_name] = value
  end

end

See Overriding default accessors in the Rails documentation.

So, your first method is the correct way to override column setters in Models of Ruby on Rails. These accessors are already provided by Rails to access the columns of the table as attributes of the model. This is what we call ActiveRecord ORM mapping.

Also keep in mind that the attr_accessible at the top of the model has nothing to do with accessors. It has a completely different functionlity (see this question)

But in pure Ruby, if you have defined accessors for a class and want to override the setter, you have to make use of instance variable like this:

class Person
  attr_accessor :name
end

class NewPerson < Person
  def name=(value)
    # do something
    @name = value
  end
end

This will be easier to understand once you know what attr_accessor does. The code attr_accessor :name is equivalent to these two methods (getter and setter)

def name # getter
  @name
end

def name=(value) #  setter
  @name = value
end

Also your second method fails because it will cause an infinite loop as you are calling the same method attribute_name= inside that method.

share|improve this answer
4  
For Rails 4 just skip attr_accessible since it's not there anymore, and it should work –  zigomir Jan 17 '14 at 21:20
6  
Why not call super? –  Nathan Lilienthal Jan 22 '14 at 16:43
1  
I was of the impression that since accessors and writers are created dynamically, super might not work. But, it seems it is not the case. I just checked it and it works for me. Also, this question ask the same –  rubyprince Jan 23 '14 at 10:14
    
There is a huge gotcha with write_attribute. Conversions will be skipped. Be aware that write_attribute will skip timezone conversions with dates, which will almost always be undesired. –  Tim Scott May 23 at 16:57

Use the super keyword:

def attribute_name=(value)
  super(value.some_custom_encode)
end

Conversely, to override the reader:

def attribute_name
  super.some_custom_decode
end
share|improve this answer

In rails 4

let say you have age attribute in your table

def age=(dob)   
    now = Time.now.utc.to_date
    age = now.year - dob.year - ((now.month > dob.month || (now.month == dob.month && now.day >= dob.day)) ? 0 : 1)
    super(age) #must add this otherwise you need to add this thing and place the value which you want to save. 
  end

Note: For new comers in rails 4 you don't need to specify attr_accessible in model. Instead you have to white-list your attributes at controller level using permit method.

share|improve this answer

I have found that (at least for ActiveRecord relationship collections) the following pattern works:

has_many :specialties

def specialty_ids=(values)
  super values.uniq.first(3)
end

(This grabs the first 3 non-duplicate entries in the array passed.)

share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much ;) –  JustBasti Feb 27 '14 at 18:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.