Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I hope someone can help me on this small problem as I'm getting no where at all. Firstly, heres the code:

#include<string>
#include<iostream>
#include<Windows.h>

using namespace std;

extern "C"
{
#include<hidsdi.h>
#include<SetupAPI.h>
}

int main()
{
    int iQuit;

    cout << "Testing Program" << endl;

    return 0;
}

It won't let me use the std stuff (ie cout, cin, endl etc). It will only allow me to use it when I take out all the extern "C" code... Why is that? And is there a way around this?

EDIT: Sorry, forget to tell you the exact error: It says identifier "cout" is undefined

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
I would not use std globally anyway. You could move the using namespace std; inside the main. –  xebo May 5 '12 at 18:51
    
What purpose does extern "C" serve here? –  David Heffernan May 5 '12 at 18:54
    
Because cout is not a C keyword but a C++ singleton instance. You can't access C++ objects from plain C code (although it's possible the other way around). –  user529758 May 5 '12 at 18:54
    
@DavidHeffernan I'm learning to write a driver so I can do stuff with my devices like keyboards and mouses, so I'm using the WDK. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought you need to use extern "C" to use those header files? –  Danny May 5 '12 at 18:57
    
Drivers are written in C and not in C++. –  David Heffernan May 5 '12 at 18:57

2 Answers 2

There is something wrong with your compilation environment. There is nothing wrong with that code. It compiles and runs fine.

In a comment to the question you say:

I'm learning to write a driver so I can do stuff with my devices like keyboards and mouses, so I'm using the WDK. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought you need to use extern "C" to use those header files?

In fact you should simply write code in C rather than C++ for driver development.

share|improve this answer
    
hmm... never knew you can compile the code as C :S. How do I check it out?? :S –  Danny May 5 '12 at 18:59
    
How are you compiling it? What compiler, and what command line option? And what is the name of the file? In particular what is the extension. –  David Heffernan May 5 '12 at 19:00
    
I'm using Visual Studios 2010. The file name is Mainframe.cpp –  Danny May 5 '12 at 19:03
    
@Danny if you rename the file Mainframe.c, it will automatically be compiled as C. –  Seth Carnegie May 5 '12 at 19:14
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've found out the problem, I weren't adding the directories in the correct order in VC++ Directories.

The order should be:

C:\WinDDK\7600.16385.1\inc\ddk

$(VCInstallDir)include

$(VCInstallDir)atlmfc\include

C:\WinDDK\7600.16385.1\inc\api

$(WindowsSdkDir)include

$(FrameworkSDKDir)\include

Don't know why it needs to be in this order, but it works now... Very strange...

share|improve this answer
    
Driver development is different. You should be writing code in C and you need to be careful which headers you include. Only include top level headers, e.g. ntddk.h –  David Heffernan May 5 '12 at 20:34
    
@DavidHeffernan Thanks for the advice :). I know you kept saying write drivers in C, but is it really that bad to be writing it in C++?? –  Danny May 5 '12 at 20:47
2  
Yes it is. What will you do when your C++ code raises an exception? That's not pretty in a driver. And there are other concerns. A websearch led me to this discussion: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/gg487420 –  David Heffernan May 5 '12 at 20:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.