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Why doesn't this:

def subsets(x):
    if not x:
        return [[]]
    else:
        return [x + y for x in [[], [x[0]]] for y in subsets(x[1:])]

print subsets(['a', 'b'])

produce the same output as this:

def subsets(x):
    if not x:
        return [[]]
    else:
        z = subsets(x[1:])
        return [x + y for x in [[], [x[0]]] for y in z]

print subsets(['a', 'b'])
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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The problem is that you are using the name x for two different things. When you introduce x as a variable inside a list comprehension it hides the x that was defined in the function. As a result, the final x in your list comprehension isn't refering to the x that you had hoped for.

Renaming one of the x to something else fixes the problem:

def subsets(original_x):
    if not original_x:
        return [[]]
    else:
        return [x + y for x in [[], [original_x[0]]]
                      for y in subsets(original_x[1:])]

I would also suggest that you try to find more descriptive names for your variables. This will reduce the likelihood of accidentally reusing a name.

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+1 - It's easy to overlook this kind of thing in list comprehensions, when you think of the individual parts as separate, and I completely agree on better names - it makes this type of error less likely, and more obvious when it happens. –  Lattyware May 5 '12 at 19:29
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